Imagination…The Wings Beneath Our Feet

He who has learning without imagination has feet but no Wings Stanley Goldstein

The Hospital Window

Two men, both seriously ill, occupied the same hospital room. One man was allowed to sit up in his bed for an hour each afternoon to help drain the fluid from his lungs. His bed was next to the room’s only window.

The other man had to spend all his time flat on his back. The men talked for hours on end. They spoke of their wives and families, their homes, their jobs, their involvement in the military service, where they had been on vacation.

And every afternoon when the man in the bed by the window could sit up, he would pass the time by describing to his roommate all the things he could see outside the window. The man in the other bed began to live for those one-hour periods where his world would be broadened and enlivened by all the activity and color of the world outside.

The window overlooked a park with a lovely lake. Ducks and swans played on the water while children sailed their model boats. Young lovers walked arm in arm amidst flowers of every color of the rainbow. Grand old trees graced the landscape, and a fine view of the city skyline could be seen in the distance.

As the man by the window described all this in exquisite detail, the man on the other side of the room would close his eyes and imagine the picturesque scene.

One warm afternoon the man by the window described a parade passing by. Although the other man couldn’t hear the band – he could see it in his mind’s eye as the gentleman by the window portrayed it with descriptive words. Days and weeks passed.

One morning, the day nurse arrived to bring water for their baths only to find the lifeless body of the man by the window, who had died peacefully in his sleep. She was saddened and called the hospital attendants to take the body away. As soon as it seemed appropriate, the other man asked if he could be moved next to the window. The nurse was happy to make the switch, and after making sure he was comfortable, she left him alone.

Slowly, painfully, he propped himself up on one elbow to take his first look at the world outside. Finally, he would have the joy of seeing it for himself.

He strained to slowly turn to look out the window beside the bed. It faced a blank wall. The man asked the nurse what could have compelled his deceased roommate who had described such wonderful things outside this window. The nurse responded that the man was blind and could not even see the wall.

She said, “Perhaps he just wanted to encourage you.”

-Unknown

Story shared from the following website: http://www.greatest-inspirational-quotes.com/hospital-window.html

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Gratitude Is the Healthiest of All Emotions…

Gratitude is the healthiest of all human emotions, the more you express gratitude for what you have, the more likely you will have even more to express gratitude for Zig ZiglarToday, as I searched for a story on gratitude and it’s healing effect, I came across a wonderful website called 365grateful.com. It is a wonderful website – I would recommend it to everyone!

Even though my intent is for you to be able to receive a quick tidbit of inspiration from this website, I am going to step beyond that a little today and share a video from 365grateful.com. I think the extra time it will take you to watch the video will be well worth it…It definitely was worth it for me.

I know that gratitude and freeing our hearts of pain, remorse and bitterness is HUGE to our health and well being. I also know it is huge in the process of letting God into our lives.

So, with that intent, I hope you will enjoy today’s story in video form:

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One Can Never Consent to Creep…Overcoming Adversity

One can never consent to creep when one feels the impulse to soar. Helen KellerAre you a fan of adversity? Do you wish it would go away and never haunt your life again?

I used to believe that adversity was a sign that my life was off track and/or I had done something to incur the Lord’s wrath.

Since the time of my near-death experience, I recognize it for what it is: difficult experiences which grow my depth, abilities and gifts.

My near-death taught me about the incalculable worth of adversity. Yet, even now, it is always difficult and often trying.

Yet, I find that as I keep my spiritual muscles well-exercised, I am able to utilize the Lord’s assistance with each trial and get through each event successfully. The bonus is that as I do so, I find myself additionally armed with greater wisdom, strength, and ammunition to address the next trial that comes my way.

What perspective do you use as you endure your trials?

I hope that as life provides difficulties, you will lean on the Lord to help you! I know that He is always there anxious to help you and me!

May great blessings be yours! I hope you will enjoy today’s story!:

Jim Abbott – A Story about Overcoming Adversity

If you’re a baseball fan—and even if you’re not—then you know that with spring comes Spring Training, wherein hope springs eternal…unless, of course, you’re a Mets fan.  (Sadly, we speak from experience here.)…

While we’re on the subject of pitchers, there have been quite a few who truly were and are inspirational people—you might say overcoming adversity is a prerequisite to succeeding in any sport.

Christy Mathewson, one of the game’s first clean-cut role models and a WWI veteran, and Sandy Koufax, another great pitcher and role model, throwing no-hitters (including a perfect game and Vin Scully’s legendary 9th inning call) while standing up for his Jewish heritage, refusing to pitch on Yom Kippur—the holiest day on the Hebrew Calendar—before coming back in pitch the Dodgers to victory, both come to mind, as does Tommy John himself, the pitcher for whom the surgery is named.overcoming adversity 6 Inspiring Stories of Overcoming Adversity You Might not Know ir t interconnectedlives 20 l as2 o 1 a 0345523261

But while Christy and Sandy are in the Hall of Fame and Tommy was a trailblazer, when it comes to overcoming adversity, few compare to Jim Abbott.  In making the big leagues, Abbott truly was one of a kind—he is the only player to have played Major League Baseball with only one hand.

As a boy, he would throw a rubber ball against a wall, slip his throwing hand into his glove—which rested on the stump which ends his right hand—and then fielded the ball using his now-gloved left hand.

But those rubber ball exercises gave Abbott great reflexes, and he went on to not just make his high school and later college baseball teams, where he not only pitched, but batted for himself—and hit home runs one-handed.

He attended and pitched for the University of Michigan, where he won the Big Ten Player of the Year in 1988.  From there he made the US Men’s Baseball Team and won an unofficial Gold medal in the 1988 Seoul Olympics, and the following year he realized his dream and made it to the big leagues, signing with the then-California Angels.

But his crowning moment of glory was still to come.  After pitching solidly for the Angels, Jim Abbott moved on to the biggest names in baseball—and sworn enemies of every Mets fan out there—the New York Yankees.

The original Yankee Stadium was called “the House that Ruth Built,” and it saw more than two dozen World Series winners, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, the 1950s Yankees of Mantle, Berra, Ford and Casey, the 1970s variety with Reggie Jackson—suffice it to say it saw some of the biggest names and moments in baseball history.

Even among such hallowed baseball history, Jim Abbott not only showed himself to be an All-Star when it came to overcoming adversity, he earned baseball immortality and joined those other Yankee greats in 1993 by pitching a no-hitter at Yankee Stadium.  He also pitched for the Chicago White Sox and Milwaukee Brewers, with whom he got his first MLB hit—an RBI.

No one overcame more physical adversity to make it to the major leagues than Jim Abbott, after that incredible no-hitter and a career that spanned more than a decade, he’s still working to inspire people, having appeared on Boy Meets World and making his living today as a motivational speaker.

Remember—with baseball, hope springs eternal.  Here’s hoping that Matt Harvey makes a great comeback this year…and that he and everyone else who plays the game may do so with the same degree of determination and character as Jim Abbott.

Story shared from the following website: http://www.interconnectedlives.com/overcoming-adversity/2/

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A Tribute to Abraham Lincoln and George Washington…Happy President’s Day!

President's Day 2017

Abraham Lincoln and George Washington are two of my heroes. I believe their greatness lies in their determination to live their lives with honor and integrity. I believe that for any life to be truly meaningful life, it must be lived with honor and integrity.

Today, I share two stories. Both of them communicate a few of the qualities that I admire and respect in these two amazing men. Happy President’s Day! I hope you will enjoy!

The Heavy Log

Once upon a time a rider came across a few soldiers who were trying to move a heavy log of wood without success.

The corporal was standing by just watching as the men struggled.

The rider couldn’t believe it. He finally asked the corporal why he wasn’t helping.

The corporal replied: “I am the corporal. I give orders.“

The rider said nothing in response. Instead he dismounted his horse. He went up and stood by the soldiers and as they tried to lift the wood and he helped them.

With his help, the task was finally able to be carried out.

Who was this kind rider?

The rider was George Washington, the Commander-in-chief.

He quietly mounted his horse and went to the corporal and said, “The next time your men need help, send for the commander-in-chief.”

Listening to a Nervous Friend

Abraham Lincoln was listening to the story of a nervous friend who was narrating about the failures and misfortunes of his life. After his narration was over, Abraham Lincoln told the person to have a glance at a board. The friend of Lincoln minutely glanced at the board and read the content written on the board. The content written on the board were the list of failures occurred to Abraham Lincoln during his life. After reading the content on the board, a new shine of hope appeared on the person’s face and he heartily thanked Lincoln for showing him a new direction towards his goal.

Let’s take a glance at the list of disheartening failures which Lincoln smiling endured and went on to become a great leader of America.

1) Unsuccessful in business   ( at age of 21)
2) Lost miserably in legislative elections (at age of 22)
3) Faced the untimely death of his sweetheart (at age of 24)
4) Had to suffer a severe nervous breakdown (at age of 27)
5) Was defeated in Congressional race (at age of 34)
6) Had to face failure of becoming a Senator (at age of 45)
7) Failed again in becoming a vice president (at age of 47)
8) Had to overcome the failure of losing Senatorial race (at age of 49)
9) Finally became the 16th President of United States of America(at age of 52)

Such heartbreaking failures could lead any person to nervous breakdown or dampen his confidence. But Lincoln faced every disappointment and failure with courage and marched on to path of success and leadership. His life was an inspiring story of courage which inspired countless leaders and upcoming youngsters all over the globe.

Story about Abraham Lincoln shared from the following website: https://prashantb.wordpress.com/2011/11/07/an-motivational-incident-from-life-of-abraham-lincoln/

Story about George Washington shared from the following website: http://baybusinesshelp.com/2013/02/15/2-stories-of-george-washington-and-the-power-of-humility/

 

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Happy Valentine’s Day…Make Sure You Love Yourself Too!

Happy Valentine's Day! Make Sure You Love Yourself Too!

It may seem odd that I make a plea for you to love yourself on Valentine’s Day – the day when we make a point of sharing how much we love others. However, I find that many if not most people don’t realize that in order love others deeply and have healthy relationships with them, we must love ourselves first.

Love is a wonderful thing and not only does it make life worth living – it is the stuff eternity is made of as well! The love I felt in heaven denies words to describe – suffice it to say that the love I felt there was glorious, inspiring and enveloping.

It was in heaven that I truly learned about the importance of loving myself. I saw that I not only loved myself there, I honored myself. We loved ourselves and each other. We honored ourselves and each other. It was truly magnificent and inspiring! The love and honor I am speaking about had no conceit or arrogance to it – it was a deep understanding of our divinity, our worth and our worthiness to be loved.

I am not there yet, but I make it a daily quest to feel about myself in mortality the way I felt about myself as I witnessed my existence in heaven, prior to my birth here in this world.

We truly are divine spiritual beings! Our world needs us to love ourselves and to manifest our deepest abilities to love! I hope you will join me in being kind to ourselves! Give yourself a pat on the back! Identify and give yourself credit for your talents, gifts, and abilities! Look in the mirror and love the reflection you are seeing! You are literally a child of God and you deserved to me loved (by yourself and others)!

Happy Valentine’s Day! I hope you enjoy the blog post I share with you from Maria Shriver!:

Learning to Love Yourself by Maria Shriver

Do you love yourself?” If you were to approach me in early 2009 and ask me that question, it would’ve been blatantly obvious that I didn’t.

There I was, 20 years old, living a sedentary lifestyle at a whopping 230 lbs.

I didn’t communicate with myself and, as a matter of fact, I didn’t communicate with anyone. I allowed myself to be bullied into silence by my peer’s comments, which left me feeling completely ashamed and worthless to all walks of life.

Some days, I didn’t even want to get out of bed, nor did I feel like I had a reason for doing so. I self-medicated with food and my unhealthy eating habits spiraled out of control.

To rid me of this empty void within my heart and soul, I brainwashed myself into thinking that food was my only comfort in life.

But my hatred towards myself became so strong that I was completely oblivious to the fact that I was slowly killing myself with food…something whose purpose, ironically, is to aid in our survival.

It wasn’t until one night, in April of 2009, that I woke up and realized that it was time to make a change.

I was tired of having my quality of life go down as the numbers went up. I was tired of feeling breathless after hauling myself up a single flight of stairs.

I was tired of avoiding social gatherings because I was too embarrassed of my existence. Most importantly, I was tired of not living.

I had to wake up from this self-induced ‘coma’ that I put myself in. I was just a body comprised of fear, hatred, and sadness — a walking billboard for the hopeless.

Believe it or not, I came to terms with my food addiction and was inspired to change by watching The Biggest Loser. And after making necessary lifestyle changes, I successfully lost 110 lbs.

Unfortunately, I didn’t focus on my psychological well-being. I was still stricken with fear. I was chained to the scale, my life controlled by numbers.

After time, my inner strength began slipping through the cracks. Self-sabotage pushed me too far in the other direction and I found myself in the same deep depressive state that I was in at 230 lbs.

If I hadn’t met a runner in late 2010, I have no idea where I’d be today.

This avid runner I mention convinced me to sign up for my 1st race after showing genuine interest after testing my limits on the treadmill. The rest is history.

Now I can proudly call myself a 2x marathoner and an ultramarathoner 2 years later. Running has trained me to run the day, not let the day run me.

I put on my cape, chased my fears, and rescued myself. I am my hero. I am me. I am Adrian.

I’m not just a runner. I’m someone with a strong passion for life. Even when a gust of wind crosses my path, I will continue to keep my flame burning bright.

The best reward of this journey is being able to say ‘I love myself’ and actually mean it.

You all have the power to love yourself, too, and here’s what I’ve learned through much struggle:

1.) Change your vocabulary. What is the first negative thought that comes to your mind? It may be something along the lines of, “I can’t do this; I’m a failure!” Repeat your thought loud and clear for the entire world to hear. Come to terms with your negativity. Bottling up these intense feelings that you have towards yourself is unhealthy, whether it has to deal with doubt, lack of respect, and so forth.

Write this thought on a piece of paper, crumple it up, and toss it into the garbage. This thought can’t destroy you any longer! Like the old saying goes, out with the old and in with the new. Start saying the exact opposite; “I can do this; I will reach my goal!” Repeat this thought over and over again, ultimately locking it up inside of your head.

When you need a moment of self-affirmation, you now hold the key to release the positivity.

2.) Grab a pen, some paper and make a list. Write down your positive attributes, greatest abilities, and biggest accomplishments. Next, identify areas in your life that you feel need to be changed or improved. Once you’re fully aware of your strengths and weaknesses, you can come up with possible solutions to the latter of the two. Instead of dwelling on what you believe needs fixed, do something about it and stop making excuses to rationalize your behavior.

Prime example: “I failed this exam, so I’m obviously a loser. I’m going to give up now.” What should really be rolling through your mind is: “This too shall pass, and I will try harder next time. This is no time to give up because I’m much stronger than this.” A little belief in one’s self goes a long way.

You have to trust your journey and love yourself before anyone else can. Come to terms with underlying problems and do differently than what has failed in the past.

3.) Bring your “little voice” to the surface and really listen. The past is the past, and oftentimes, the little voice inside of our heads is merely a result of our past conditioning. It’s a bundle of experiences, could’ves, would’ves, should’ves, regrets, wishes, etc. Don’t let the past control your future. You hold the power to change your current situation for the better.

Your inner voice is only a wall, and that wall doesn’t have to be permanently erect. Bring your inner voice to the surface, actively listen, and dismantle any unnecessary fears that may pose a threat to your future success. Be the change that you wish to see in the world, even if it’s your world. Your world is no less important than anyone else’s, so don’t allow it to be.

“Once the caterpillar thought the world was over, it became a butterfly.” Sure ,the caterpillar was probably unhappy in it’s former state, but now it’s free to fly away and embrace the life that it was always destined to have.

It’s time to break through your cocoon and spread your wings. I’ll see you there when you do.

This blog post was made by Maria Shriver and is shared from the following website: http://mariashriver.com/blog/2013/02/learning-to-love-yourself-adrian-crouch/

 

 

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