We are Capable of the Impossible!

“It’s impossible,” said Pride “It’s risky,” said Experience “It’s Pointless,” said Reason “Give it a try,” said the Heart ¨Unknown

Do you have accomplishing the “Impossible” burning in your heart? Do people tell you that your dreams are impossible and that they will never happen?

There is a secret to accomplishing impossible tasks – YOU have to believe that they are possible! Not just on a conscious level but on a subconscious level as well.

We all have an important contribution to make to the world – what is yours?

As you dream over this holiday weekend, I hope that you will be inspired by the following fun facts!:

Fun Facts about Great Accomplishments

All the world’s greats would never have been great if they had listened to the opinion of even their closest friends.

Caruso, the world’s greatest tenor, was told his voice sounded like a tin can.

Thomas Edison, the inventor of motion pictures, was advised that no-one would pay to listen to sound coming from a screen.

Edison told Henry Ford to give up making cars and work for him instead and make millions.

Marie Curie was told to forget about radium.

Laurence Olivier was told by friends to give up acting.

Benjamin Franklin was told to stop fiddling with lightning.

People told Johnny Weissmuller (Tarzan) that no-one would ever beat his fifty swimming records. His 1936 world record was the qualifying time for the 1972 Olympics! Attitudes of the time said his records could never be beaten. Now 12 year old girls regularly beat his times.

Christopher Columbus took 14 years to raise funding for his ships and crew before setting out on his explorations. The science and culture of the day had said that the world was flat. However, Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain had faith in Columbus. With that faith and money behind him, Columbus took just six months to discover the New World.

In the same way, a “flat-world mind-set” can limit our thinking and lead to mediocrity. In the same way that you can train fleas to jump a certain height in a bowl, when you take away the bowl, they still do not jump higher than the learned height.

Our mind can tie us down and limit us, so that mediocrity becomes our destiny. Negative attitudes get cemented in concrete.

Abraham Lincoln grew up in a very difficult environment. He had less than one year of formal schooling. He experienced defeat and failure year after year, but is one of the greatest success stories of all time. In spite of everything, he had the right attitude to achieve success.

Today’s fun facts shared from the following website: http://fortunefavours.blogspot.com/2007/07/people-who-achieved-impossible-with_12.html

 

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To Dream the Impossible Dream!

I have learned to use the word impossible with the utmost caution Werner von Braun

What makes a goal or task impossible? Fear? Difficult Odds?

I love a quote by Dieter F. Uchtdorf. It says, “When God works through us, No one and Nothing can stand against us.”

I have several “impossible goals”. I don’t know how long it will take to accomplish them but accomplish them I will. I know this not because I believe that I am smarter than anyone else or more talented than anyone else – I know this because I know that I am being guided in these goals by God.

I don’t know all that there is to know but I do know that God has guided me before and with that guidance, I have done things that others considered impossible. Therefore, I believe in His ability to guide me to do the impossible any and every time I feel a task from God in my heart.

Are you listening to your heart? I hope that you realize that your heart needs to be listened to! I also hope you know that God knows you best and He knows what will bring you abundance and joy much better than you do!

I hope as you read today’s inspirational story that you will listen to your heart and what it is telling you! Enjoy!

When Your Goal Is the Impossible by Dan Pallotta 

(Written in 2010)

I’m writing this because a plane carrying an Uruguayan rugby team went down in the Andes mountains 38 years ago.

Twenty-one years later Frank Marshall made a movie called Alive based on the story. The film brings to life the experiences of 29 people who survived the crash and struggled to remain alive in the snow and freezing temperatures of the Andes for three interminably long months. An avalanche takes the lives of eight of them one morning. Five others die from their injuries and exposure during the ordeal. After learning by radio that efforts to find them had been called off, two of the survivors set out on an impossible odyssey to breach the Andes and send a rescue team back.

At one point during their quest one of them calls to his friend, “Come up here, man, you’ve got to see this, it’s beautiful.” The audience thinks he sees civilization. The camera pans to his view to show a nauseating infinity of snow-capped mountain peaks. No end in sight.

His friend says, “We’re going to die up here.” And the other replies, “Do you know what it is that we made it this far? It’s impossible, that’s what it is. If we’re going to die, we’re going to die walking.”

They breach the Andes. They find their way to the green valleys of Chile and make contact with the outside world. The closing scene of the film is of the survivors hearing helicopter engines and then seeing the choppers come into full view, with the two friends that saved them waving from inside.

The credits rolled and I couldn’t stop crying.

For two years before I saw the film, I’d had this idea for a 600-mile bicycle ride to raise money for AIDS but was too intimidated to do anything about it. Walking out of the theater, some voice that didn’t seem entirely mine said, “That’s it, we’re going to build the AIDS Ride.” And the next day my staff and I began trying to figure out how to get 500 people to bicycle from San Francisco to Los Angeles. It seemed impossible at the time. It hadn’t been done before. But a little over a year later, 478 heroic people of all shapes and sizes, most of whom hadn’t been on a bike in years, finished the 600-mile journey, netting a million dollars for AIDS.

As we rode into West Hollywood together, I couldn’t stop crying.

I would cry at dozens of these kinds of closing ceremonies over the years as tens of thousands of average people completed long journeys after raising large sums of money for urgent causes — both things they never thought they could accomplish when they started.

In a great documentary on the Apollo program, Eugene Kranz, the flight director of all those missions, reminisces about what had been accomplished during that unique period in American history.

He couldn’t stop crying.

I’m typing this week’s post on my new iPad 3G — truly a marvel of imagination, technology, and tenacity. It’s amazing not just because of the technology itself, but because of all the work building partnerships over the years that went into making it what it is — the negotiations with record labels and movie makers that made iTunes possible, enrolling Time magazine and countless others in its promise, and the nurturing of the network of app developers that helped make the thing the mind-boggling device that it is. Now, Steve Jobs was thrown out of the company he created. He has waged a fierce battle for his life against pancreatic cancer. He has stared deeply into the abyss of despair one feels when their dreams have been crushed and seem to be gone forever. I may be wrong, but I have to believe that at some point, using his own iPad and measuring the true distance he had come to make it real, Steve Jobs must have found himself crying.

As a mentor of mine reminds me, human beings are unique in our ability to achieve the impossible. Elephants don’t do it. Gorillas don’t. Mice don’t. We humans live in a world where everything falls but we say, let’s make things fly. The crying that ensues is an outgrowth of self-actualization. It is the profundity of experiencing the full depth of our human potential and it is unspeakably beautiful.

On the AIDS Rides we had a phrase for it: I’mpossible.

In my office, I keep two books out where I can see them: Inferno, James Nachtwey’s horrific and heartbreaking photo documentations on the effects of genocide, AIDS, and starvation on nameless and forgotten human beings all around the world, and Full Moon, a collection of high-resolution Hasselblad images from the Apollo lunar missions.

The Nachtwey book makes me think of eradicating hunger in our lifetime — a task that seems impossible. The NASA book reminds me of one of the most impossible things humanity ever accomplished.

And they both make me cry.

No matter what you are trying to do, whether in business or charity or social enterprise, if the thought of it doesn’t scare the hell out of you — and if imagining the manifestation of it doesn’t make you cry — it isn’t worthy of who you truly are.

Today’s inspirational story is shared from the following website: https://hbr.org/2010/05/when-your-goal-is-the-impossib.html

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Learning from Mistakes…

Our Greatest glory is not in never failing but in rising up ever time we fail.  - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Our Greatest glory is not in never failing
but in rising up ever time we fail. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Have you ever felt like the odds and the world were stacked against you? I think we all have at least a few of those days as we journey through our lives. Most of us have more than just a few.

Sometimes, we can feel like if we don’t succeed the first time we try, that we are not cut out for whatever it is we are trying to do. The reality is that even the most gifted people have to work through difficulty and failure from time to time.

Thomas Edison is a person that I would have loved to have known. His attitude and his willingness to fail blessed the lives of modern man every single day. I credit his amazing mother for instilling in him a willingness to learn and to fail. She must have been an amazing person as well.

The next time you get frustrated with life and with your failures, I hope you will take a moment to ask yourself, “What is God trying to teach me with this experience?”  Chances are the only way you are going to truly fail is if you decide to give up.

I hope you enjoy today’s story! I couldn’t resist sharing a Thomas Edison story!:

Thomas Edison Childhood – Inspirational Story

One day Thomas Edison came home and gave a paper to his mother. He told his mother that his teacher gave this paper to him and said, “Give this to your mother.”

His mother open it and read the paper. After reading paper her eyes filled with tears. Thomas asked his mother about what was written in the paper.

She read the letter in a loud voice to her son, “Your son is a genius, this school is too small for him and we don’t have enough resources and good teachers to train him. Please teach him yourself.”

After many years, now Edison’s mother died and he has become one of the greatest inventors. One day as Edison was looking into old family things he saw a folded paper in the corner of his desk drawer. He took it and opened it.

It was the same paper which was given to him by his teacher in school to give to his mother.

After reading the paper, Edison cried for hours and wrote in his diary, “Thomas Alva Edison was an addled (mentally ill) child that, by a hero mother, became the genius of the century.

Moral: One should never give up. We need to be confident in ourselves and move ahead in life with a positive attitude and hard work.

Story shared from the following website: http://moralstories26.com/thomas-edison-inspirational-stories-for-kids/

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There are No Constraints on the Human Mind…With the Right Attitude

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There are no constraints on the human mind…we can do amazing things when we believe we can. All it takes is the right attitude! I often talk about faith in God but we also need to have faith in ourselves.

It becomes an incredible formula for success when we combine faith in God with faith in ourselves! I remember a poster that used to hang in the main office of an elementary school that my children attended. It listed the percentage of likelihood that something would be accomplished based on the mindset of an individual. In other words, our attitude was the overriding determining factor when trying to predict success! Would you be surprised to learn that the likelihood of success for  “I Can’t” is 0% while the success rate for “I Will” is 100%? I doubt that you were any more surprised than I was. Yet, how many times do we say we can’t do something while not recognizing that we are dooming our success from the very beginning?

Think about your own thoughts..are you allowing your thoughts to hold you back? If so, know that you can retrain your thoughts and that, with practice, utilizing control of your thoughts becomes easier and easier! You can choose to make the transition from I can’t to I will!

Today, I want to share a story by Jim Abbott. I hope you enjoy!

It Is Not What’s Gone – But What’s Given

Not too long ago a little girl in my neighborhood was born without a hand. She was born just after my own second daughter Ella was born. Her parents were obviously shaken up. About a week later, I saw them at a neighborhood function and they came over to me and asked what my thoughts were, if I had any advice, for them and for their daughter. My advice? This is their daughter’s life and they were asking my advice? Talk about humbling. What do you say? I had nothing very smart to say.

I told myself I wouldn’t let that happen again. That it was important that I could share what I have learned.

I’ve learned that there are millions of people out there ignoring disabilities and accomplishing incredible feats. I learned that you can learn to do things differently, but do them just as well. I’ve learned that it’s not the disability that defines you, it’s how you deal with the challenges the disability presents you with. I’ve learned that we have an obligation to the abilities we do have, not the disability.

I was born without my right hand. I have never felt slighted. As a kid I was pretty coordinated and growing up I loved sports. I learned to play baseball like most kids, playing catch with my Dad in the front yard. The only difference was that we had to come up with a method to throw and catch with the same hand. What we came up with, is basically what I continued to do my whole life. I used to practice by pretending to be my favorite pitchers. I’d throw a ball against a brick wall on the side of our house, switching the glove off and on, moving closer to the wall- forcing myself to get that glove on faster and faster. I imagined myself becoming a successful athlete.

Growing up, sports were my way of gaining acceptance. I guess somewhere deep inside I was thinking if I was good enough on the field then maybe kids wouldn’t think of me as being so different. Honestly I hid behind sports. I wanted the attention that comes from being successful, but I was very reluctant to draw any attention to my disability You know it’s funny, there was an article in the L.A. Times recently about a high school pitcher who has been doing very well— despite missing one hand. He mentioned my name as an example but went on to say he didn’t want to be like me, he wanted to be like Randy Johnson. At first my feelings were hurt, but then I understood. That’s exactly the same way I felt growing up. I didn’t want to be defined by a disability. Focus on my pitching and not my hand.

I loved throwing a baseball. It is so important to find something in life you feel crazy about. Because you are so passionate you naturally practice, the hard work that it takes to do something well will come easily.

You know how it worked out. I got to play baseball at the University of Michigan, 2 United States teams The 1987 Pan American team and the 1988 United States Olympic team. Even though I played in the major leagues for almost 10 years the Olympics are still one of my favorite memories.

You know in my career I once won 18 games in a year, I also lost 18 games in one year. I was fortunate enough to go straight from the Olympic team to the major leagues. Never spending a day in the minors. I was also sent down to the minor leagues after 8 years in the big leagues. In 1996 I went 2-18 with a 7 run era . I couldn’t get anyone out. I was in the first year of a long term contract with a team near my home. It was supposed to be easy. That following year I was fired. Drove back to California, crying all the way. I spent that summer up in Michigan hurting and wondering if my career was over. Somewhere deep inside I wasn’t sure. So I called the Chicago White Sox for a try out.

They gave me a chance to pitch again. I would watch the major leagues on t.v. with the rest of those kids and it felt like a million miles away. That had been my life. I was away from my family who I know thought I was crazy. Then I got the call I was going to Chicago back to the show. That was the good news, bad news your facing the Yankees Sat. night. They were about 100 and 15 at the time. I went on to win that game against the Yankees that night. In fact I went 5-0 the rest of that Sept.

I would like to tell those parents back in my neighborhood how wonderful my own parents were, and are. They encouraged me to participate, but didn’t dwell on every move I made. I don’t ever remember a concession to the fact that I had one hand. Maybe even a little more was expected. I will always be thankful that they never allowed my hand to be used as an excuse.

I would like to tell that little girl, “Go out and find what it is that you love. It may not be the most obvious choice or the most logical but never let that stop you.” Baseball was hardly the most the most logical choice for someone with one hand, but I loved it, so that’s what I pursued. No matter where the road takes you don’t give up until you know in your heart you done everything you possibly could to make your dreams come true. You owe nothing to disability, ignore it. When you fail, get back up and try again. Leave no room for an excuse. Don’t listen to what you can’t do. 99% of the time I never think of missing a hand. I have never been envious of someone with two hands. Listen to that voice deep within you, it knows, when you’ve done your best.

Somehow when things are said and done there will be some accountability imagine someone coming up to you at the end of your life and saying “you’ve been given these talents what did you do with them.” There is a certain potential we owe it to ourselves to live up to. Work hard, don’t look back, celebrate the blessings in your life.

– Jim Abbott

SPEECH FROM Jim Abbott, one-handed famed professional baseball pitcher

Story shared from the following website: http://www.aboutonehandtyping.com/storiesfolder/jimabbottnotgone.html

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When We Listen to God’s Guidance…

Fantastic winter sunset. dramatic evening sky. beautiful world. fascinating vision. creative collage

My life has been blessed with many miracles. I hope your life has been blessed by miracles as well! Some may think that God uses miracles to convince His children of His existence. I do not believe that to be the case. I believe that miracles are a gift to those that believe. I know that there are occasions when non-believers have experienced miracles but I believe those are rare exceptions. I have found that the more I learn to listen to God’s guidance, the greater the number of miracles that my life is blessed with. Not only are there more, I am able to recognize those miracles with much greater clarity. I think the Pharaoh that contended with Moses is a perfect example. I don’t think Pharaoh was ever that impressed with the miracles that he saw – loss seems to have been his greater motivator.  Can you imagine how amazing the story would have been if Pharaoh would have been converted to God and His ways?!! What if Moses and Pharaoh had teamed up to build a temple rather than the Israelites wandering for forty years? I think one of the greatest miracles that occurred with Moses was Moses himself. He went from a reluctant participant to a man of tremendous faith and ability. I believe that each of us is meant to make a similar transformation. We are meant to take the unformed clay that we currently are and work with God to transform us into a masterpiece. Each of us is meant to be our own miracle!

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