To Be Happy…Be Kind and Pleasant

Happiness cannot be traveled to,  owned, earned, worn  or consumed. Happiness is the spiritual experience of living every miniute with Love, Grace, and Gratitude   Denis Waitley

Kindness and Happiness go hand in hand. After all, how could we be truly content and happy by making others miserable?

I have lived long enough to observe many “before and after” stories. My observations have shown that those who are self-absorbed, mean and cranky always get a healthy dose of their own medicine. It doesn’t always come right away, but come it does.

I know of nothing that makes me happier than to see another smile and know that I, in some way, contributed to that smile.

We have been talking about obtaining happiness all week. The best way I know of to make sure that we are not happy is to mope, complain, and hold onto bitterness. The best way I know of being happy is to work for it and to try to make others happy.

When I talk about making others happy, I’m not talking about enabling unhealthy behaviors, I am talking about doing kind things. Sharing a compliment, sharing a treat, a smile, or helping another out are easy and simple ways to be kind.

As I observed heaven during my near-death experience, it was such an aha moment for me to see and witness how prevalent our kindness, love, and honor was for each other. We didn’t share false compliments – we genuinely gloried in lifting each other up and praising each other for our talents and goodness. (Our world could really take a lesson from heaven!) We didn’t care that someone else had greater knowledge or talents, we were overwhelmingly grateful for all of the talents, abilities, and knowledge that God had blessed us with and we felt the same gratitude for all that others had received from God as well.

As you read today’s excerpt from the article by Jeffrey R. Holland entitled The Gospel Path to Happiness, I hope you will think about how you can bring greater happiness into your own life. I know that the Lord wants you and me and all of His children to be happy! I know  that He loves each and every one of us and wants nothing but the best for us! We just have to consent to His efforts to help us and be willing to work alongside of Him!

Be Kind and Pleasant

Here is another. In preparing this message, I sat in my study for a long time trying to think if I had ever known a happy person who was unkind or unpleasant to be with. And guess what? I couldn’t think of one—not a single, solitary one. So learn this great truth early in life: You can never build your happiness on someone else’s unhappiness.

Sometimes, maybe especially when we are young and insecure and trying to make our way up in the world, we think if we can tear someone else down a little, it will somehow miraculously lift us up. That is what bullying is. That is what catty remarks are. That is what arrogance and superficiality and exclusiveness are. Perhaps we think if we are negative enough or cynical enough or just plain mean enough, then expectations won’t be too high; we can keep everyone down to a flaw-filled level, and therefore our flaws won’t be so glaring.

Happy people aren’t negative or cynical or mean, so don’t plan on that being part of the “manner of happiness.” If my life has taught me anything, it is that kindness and pleasantness and faith-based optimism are characteristics of happy people. In the words of Mother Teresa, “Let no one ever come to you without leaving better and happier. Be the living expression of God’s kindness—kindness in your face, kindness in your eyes, kindness in your smile, kindness in your warm greeting.”8

A related step along the path toward happiness is to avoid animosity, contention, and anger in your life. Remember, it is Lucifer, Satan, the adversary of us all, who loves anger. He “is the father of contention, and he stirreth up the hearts of men to contend with anger, one with another” (3 Nephi 11:29).

After quoting that verse in general conference a few years ago, Elder Lynn G. Robbins of the Seventy said, “The verb stir sounds like a recipe for disaster: Put tempers on medium heat, stir in a few choice words, and bring to a boil; continue stirring until thick; cool off; let feelings chill for several days; serve cold; lots of leftovers.”9 Lots of leftovers indeed.

Anger damages or destroys almost everything it touches. As someone has said, to harbor anger is like drinking poison and waiting for the other person to die. It is a vicious acid that will destroy the container long before it does damage to the intended object. There is nothing in it or its cousinly vices—violence, rage, bitterness, and hate—that has anything to do with living the gospel or the pursuit of happiness. I do not think anger can exist—or at least be fostered and entertained and indulged in—in a life being lived “after the manner of happiness.”

This excerpt from the Gospel Path to Happiness by Jeffrey R. Holland was shared from the following website: https://www.lds.org/ensign/2017/09/the-gospel-path-to-happiness?lang=eng

 

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Giving Service is Like Giving Yourself a Gift!

He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose Jim Elliot

Heaven seems to be minimized all too frequently in today’s world. Having made a premature visit there, I know just how wonderful and important heaven is.  🙂

It doesn’t take dollars or possessions to make your way back to heaven…it takes love and goodness!

In heaven, narcissism is out and benevolence is in. No more what’s in it for me. Instead, we love and honor each other and make our decisions based on how can I best serve the whole? God? Mankind? Sound horrible? It’s not – it’s glorious!!!

Heaven is not a place of scarcity – it is a place of abundance. In heaven, we can all have all of our hearts desire, as long as that desire is good and not hurtful to others.

Heaven is a place of honor and it is a place of stewardship. We honor each others gifts whether we have few or many. Each talent or gift that we have is not just a source of pride but an opportunity to serve in a special way.  Therefore, gifts and talents are cherished in heaven and great effort is made to develop them and share them.

I believe that the greater part of mankind wants to love and serve our fellow man. I think that often what gets in our way is that we think that we have to have great wealth or an abundance of extra time to help others out.

The reality is that we each have the ability to contribute in a positive way to the world around us – even if that contribution today can only be a kind word and a smile!

I love today’s story! I hope it will inspire your day and your life!

Christmas Angel

When Delwyn Collins was a kid growing up in the projects of Fort Worth, Texas, he was labeled handicapped with a learning disability and sent to a special education school. His teachers never suspected that Collins was a genius at caring: Today the 52-year-old cafeteria worker at Tampa General Hospital is nothing less than an angel to hundreds of foster children in Hills-borough County, Florida. These children—many with special needs and often moved from home to home—tug hard at Collins’s heart. Christmas 2010 will mark the 21st year he has set up a Foster Angel’s Giving Tree decorated with paper angels bearing the first names, ages, and gender of foster children and the gifts each child would like to receive.

Collins is a man of modest means, but each week he sets aside a portion of his paycheck to buy gifts to put under the tree. “I just want to show these children there is somebody out there in the community who loves them.” His unpretentious example has inspired the doctors, nurses, and administrators he works with to make the Giving Tree a priority. Hospital employees and visitors take an angel off the tree and buy the present the child has requested.

As Christmas nears, bicycles, dolls, clothes, and video games begin to overflow the cafeteria. In recent years, the program has begun to receive presents from donors throughout the county. More than 1,000 kids in foster care in and around Tampa received gifts in 2009. “My job is to help and give to others,” says Collins. “God doesn’t care if we’re rich or poor.”

Story Shared from the following website: http://www.rd.com/true-stories/inspiring/5-stories-that-celebrate-the-spirit-of-giving/2/

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Living an Inspired Life

As soon as you seek to Inspire others, it Inspires the best in you Brendon Burchard

I don’t know that I can adequately explain why, but ever since my near-death experience, I have been entranced by the influence of simple acts. Think of a small pebble being thrown into a calm lake and the ripples that extend from the spot at which the pebble enters into the water – how can you quantify the influence of that small pebble?

Today’s story resonates with me. I, too, have had those experiences in which just a small kind act of a stranger has made all the difference in the world.

I remember the day after my father died. I had to run to the store. I had visited that store many times. Yet, as I wandered the aisles, it was a different world that I lived in. My world had been changed as my father had taken his last breath. My world would never be the same. I wondered how many of the strangers that surrounded me in the store could sense my loss. I guessed that my loss was invisible to those around me. And I wondered, how many times had I been that stranger in the store – oblivious to the loss or devastation that someone in my circle of influence had experienced? How many times could a little more patience or warm smile have helped a stranger in need?

Could there be a chance for me to spread love and light every time I enter the doors of my local supermarket? What about the help team I access online? Could my sincere gratitude for their help make their day – even if it is their job to provide me with that help?

I am going to make a conscious effort to be more kind, to smile more, and to exercise more patience. I hope you have a wonderful weekend!

Please enjoy today’s story as I did!:

Love is in the Moment  By Annie

It was early morning, yet already it had been a stupendously bad day. One thing after another. The downward spiral continued when a large pitcher of orange juice slid from my hands and smashed to the floor.Glass and sticky juice spewed to the farthest corners of the kitchen, slithering down cabinets and appliances, puddling at my feet.

Stunned, I looked at the mess. Then I dropped dejectedly down to the floor, my eyes filling with overdue tears. The tears came from begrudging and angry acceptance that “today is just not my day.”

Bad day or not, errands had to be done. Filled with angst and negative mental baggage, I got in my car to drive into town. In the few minutes it took to travel to the bank I made a decision. I would be careful not to pass my bad day off to anyone else. I would be cordial and polite. And I would NOT retaliate when that harried driver pulled quickly and rudely in front of me causing me to slam on my breaks, dumping the contents of my drink onto the front car seat!

Standing in line at the bank, I was silently talking to myself. Actually, I was scolding myself. All of the events that had accumulated and contributed to my bad day were, in reality, so very minor and trivial. I was over-reacting. I was indulging in self-pity. I tried to imagine the innumerable, individual lives that had been affected by 9/11, by war, by hurricanes, earthquakes, and other natural disasters.

For the second time that day my eyes filled with tears as I realized how disconnected I felt from all those individuals who are trying to cope with truly traumatic events in their lives. They all seemed so distant and unknowable, and this justified and intensified my belief that I was being self-centered and selfish. I was sure that all my efforts to be a caring and loving person were for naught.

A voice broke through my mental distractions. Somehow I had mechanically finished my bank transaction and the teller was trying to get my attention. “Young lady,” she was saying, “Young lady!”

I looked up and into the eyes of the bank teller, a silver-haired grandmother with a gentle beauty. Her keen eyes reflected concern as she leaned forward and softly said, “I don’t know what is happening inside of you, but please, believe me when I tell you that – everything will be okay.”

And then she did something quite marvelous. My hands were resting on the counter. She took her hands and placed them gently on top of mine. The touch was quick but electric. And in that moment my world shifted.

In the moment of her touch my self-doubt vanished. I found understanding and acceptance. I knew that love was being channeled through the heart of this beautiful woman directly into my heart. I was infused with a profound awareness – that I am loved. I was speechless. I smiled. It was my first smile of the day. But it would not be my last, as from that moment on my entire day was transformed.

Perhaps without even knowing it, the kind-hearted bank teller allowed herself to be a conduit of divine love. She was instrumental in transforming a day that seemed destined to be a day of tears into a day of smiles. The seemingly small gesture of a this gentle woman not only changed the course of my day, it became a powerful reminder in my life. The profound effect of that one simple, loving touch remains in my heart to this day.

More people than not scoff at the idea of world peace. Laugh if you wish. As for myself, I believe it is possible to transform our world … one act of loving kindness at a time. Remember: A simple smile. A warm handshake. A kind word. A gentle hug. Through these, we open the transformative power of love.

Today’s inspiring story is shared from the following website: https://www.personalgrowthcourses.net/stories/ttinspiringstories


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The Heart of a Man…

It’s not the size of a man but the size of his Heart that matters Evander HolyfieldToday has been a busy day filled with lots to do and (thankfully!) the energy to do it all!Therefore, I am going to keep my comments brief! I hope you are having a wonderful day and that you are inspired by today’s story!

Big Feet and Big Heart

It was an unseasonably hot day. Everybody it seemed, was looking for some kind of relief, so an ice cream store was a natural place to stop.

A little girl, clutching her money tightly, entered the store. Before she could say a word, the store clerk sharply told her to get outside and read the sign on the door, and stay out until she put on some shoes. She left slowly, and a big man followed her out of the store.

He watched as she stood in front of the store and read the sign: ‘No Bare Feet’. Tears started rolling down her cheeks as she turned and started to walked away. Just then the big man called to her. Sitting down on the curb, he took off his size-12 shoes, and set them in front of the girl saying, “Here, you won’t be able to walk in these, but if you sort of slide along, you can get your ice cream cone.”

Then he lifted the little girl up and set her feet into the shoes. “Take your time,” he said, “I get tired of moving them around, and it’ll feel good to just sit here and eat my ice cream.” The shining eyes of the little girl could not be missed as she shuffled up to the counter and ordered her ice cream cone.

He was a big man, all right. Big belly, big shoes, but most of all, he had a big heart.

Story shared from the following website: http://www.skywriting.net/inspirational/stories/big_feet-big_heart.html

 

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Life Turns Out Best When You Have a Good Attitude!

Things turn out  best for the people  who make the best  of the ways things  turn out   Coach John WoodenIt is easy to have a bad attitude. It takes work and diligent effort to have a good attitude. Some believe that a positive attitude comes naturally to some people. I don’t believe it at all. I believe that it takes a conscious effort. I also believe it is worth every bit of effort it takes.

I remember reading a story about a kind man by the name of David O. McKay. He was a busy man and advanced in his years. One day, in an airport, as he sat waiting for his next flight, a difficult situation presented itself.

A young man with three very energetic young children sat nearby. The three children were being very noisy and very disrupting to the passengers around them. The father sat in his seat doing nothing to curtail the antics of his children.

The passengers who were waiting nearby began making rude comments under their breath – hoping the man would take the hint and do something about his children.

David McKay took a moment and went over and talked to the young father. He told him that he noticed that he seemed to be deep in thought and wondered if there was anything he could do to help the young man with his children.

The young father then buried his face in his hands. He explained that he and his children had just come from the hospital and that his wife had just passed away. He was still in shock from the loss of his wife.

Mr. McKay then tenderly attended the young father and his children.

As he did, the nearby passengers heard the conversation and were then embarrassed by their behavior – clearly their behavior had only contributed to further hurt and distress to the young man.

What a difference it made when David McKay decided not to make assumptions and instead, decided to exercise some kindness and ask questions before he passed judgement.

I wonder how many times I have been guilty of wrongly passing judgement? I hope the number of times is small and I hope that I have never hurt someone in the process.

I hope you enjoy today’s story – after all, everyone is important!

Everyone is Important.

During Mark’s first month of college, the professor gave his students a pop quiz. He was a conscientious student and had breezed through the questions, until he read the last one: “What is the first name of the woman who cleans the school?” Surely this was some kind of joke. He had seen the cleaning woman several times. She was tall, dark-haired and in her 50s, but how would he know her name? He handed in his paper, leaving the last question blank.

Just before class ended, one student asked if the last question would count toward the quiz grade. “Absolutely,” said the professor. “In your careers, you will meet many people. All are significant. They each deserve your attention and care, even if all you do is smile and say ‘hello’”. Mark never forgot that lesson. He also learned her name was Dorothy.

Everyone in your life is everyone just like the people you give importance to.

Story shared from the following website: https://whitepage4u.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/7-inspiring-short-stories-to-change-our-attitude-for-life/

 

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