To Dream the Impossible Dream!

I have learned to use the word impossible with the utmost caution Werner von Braun

What makes a goal or task impossible? Fear? Difficult Odds?

I love a quote by Dieter F. Uchtdorf. It says, “When God works through us, No one and Nothing can stand against us.”

I have several “impossible goals”. I don’t know how long it will take to accomplish them but accomplish them I will. I know this not because I believe that I am smarter than anyone else or more talented than anyone else – I know this because I know that I am being guided in these goals by God.

I don’t know all that there is to know but I do know that God has guided me before and with that guidance, I have done things that others considered impossible. Therefore, I believe in His ability to guide me to do the impossible any and every time I feel a task from God in my heart.

Are you listening to your heart? I hope that you realize that your heart needs to be listened to! I also hope you know that God knows you best and He knows what will bring you abundance and joy much better than you do!

I hope as you read today’s inspirational story that you will listen to your heart and what it is telling you! Enjoy!

When Your Goal Is the Impossible by Dan Pallotta 

(Written in 2010)

I’m writing this because a plane carrying an Uruguayan rugby team went down in the Andes mountains 38 years ago.

Twenty-one years later Frank Marshall made a movie called Alive based on the story. The film brings to life the experiences of 29 people who survived the crash and struggled to remain alive in the snow and freezing temperatures of the Andes for three interminably long months. An avalanche takes the lives of eight of them one morning. Five others die from their injuries and exposure during the ordeal. After learning by radio that efforts to find them had been called off, two of the survivors set out on an impossible odyssey to breach the Andes and send a rescue team back.

At one point during their quest one of them calls to his friend, “Come up here, man, you’ve got to see this, it’s beautiful.” The audience thinks he sees civilization. The camera pans to his view to show a nauseating infinity of snow-capped mountain peaks. No end in sight.

His friend says, “We’re going to die up here.” And the other replies, “Do you know what it is that we made it this far? It’s impossible, that’s what it is. If we’re going to die, we’re going to die walking.”

They breach the Andes. They find their way to the green valleys of Chile and make contact with the outside world. The closing scene of the film is of the survivors hearing helicopter engines and then seeing the choppers come into full view, with the two friends that saved them waving from inside.

The credits rolled and I couldn’t stop crying.

For two years before I saw the film, I’d had this idea for a 600-mile bicycle ride to raise money for AIDS but was too intimidated to do anything about it. Walking out of the theater, some voice that didn’t seem entirely mine said, “That’s it, we’re going to build the AIDS Ride.” And the next day my staff and I began trying to figure out how to get 500 people to bicycle from San Francisco to Los Angeles. It seemed impossible at the time. It hadn’t been done before. But a little over a year later, 478 heroic people of all shapes and sizes, most of whom hadn’t been on a bike in years, finished the 600-mile journey, netting a million dollars for AIDS.

As we rode into West Hollywood together, I couldn’t stop crying.

I would cry at dozens of these kinds of closing ceremonies over the years as tens of thousands of average people completed long journeys after raising large sums of money for urgent causes — both things they never thought they could accomplish when they started.

In a great documentary on the Apollo program, Eugene Kranz, the flight director of all those missions, reminisces about what had been accomplished during that unique period in American history.

He couldn’t stop crying.

I’m typing this week’s post on my new iPad 3G — truly a marvel of imagination, technology, and tenacity. It’s amazing not just because of the technology itself, but because of all the work building partnerships over the years that went into making it what it is — the negotiations with record labels and movie makers that made iTunes possible, enrolling Time magazine and countless others in its promise, and the nurturing of the network of app developers that helped make the thing the mind-boggling device that it is. Now, Steve Jobs was thrown out of the company he created. He has waged a fierce battle for his life against pancreatic cancer. He has stared deeply into the abyss of despair one feels when their dreams have been crushed and seem to be gone forever. I may be wrong, but I have to believe that at some point, using his own iPad and measuring the true distance he had come to make it real, Steve Jobs must have found himself crying.

As a mentor of mine reminds me, human beings are unique in our ability to achieve the impossible. Elephants don’t do it. Gorillas don’t. Mice don’t. We humans live in a world where everything falls but we say, let’s make things fly. The crying that ensues is an outgrowth of self-actualization. It is the profundity of experiencing the full depth of our human potential and it is unspeakably beautiful.

On the AIDS Rides we had a phrase for it: I’mpossible.

In my office, I keep two books out where I can see them: Inferno, James Nachtwey’s horrific and heartbreaking photo documentations on the effects of genocide, AIDS, and starvation on nameless and forgotten human beings all around the world, and Full Moon, a collection of high-resolution Hasselblad images from the Apollo lunar missions.

The Nachtwey book makes me think of eradicating hunger in our lifetime — a task that seems impossible. The NASA book reminds me of one of the most impossible things humanity ever accomplished.

And they both make me cry.

No matter what you are trying to do, whether in business or charity or social enterprise, if the thought of it doesn’t scare the hell out of you — and if imagining the manifestation of it doesn’t make you cry — it isn’t worthy of who you truly are.

Today’s inspirational story is shared from the following website: https://hbr.org/2010/05/when-your-goal-is-the-impossib.html

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Are You Living the Life You Were Created For…or an Ordinary Life?

I can’t believe that God put us on  this earth just to be ordinary   Lou Holtz

If you feel like you are no one special and that you have nothing to offer, You have quit listening to your heart. In fact, maybe you don’t know that your heart speaks to you?

When my oldest daughter was born (also my first child), my husband made me a drawing of her. On the drawing, he included a quote that contained the following phrase, “Cause God doesn’t make any junk”.

It was a cute quote then…now I realize that it is profound. I hope that you know your value and I hope that in your heart, you, in some way, can feel of your worth and importance.

You were not born to be someone ordinary. You were born to be extraordinary!

I hope you enjoy today’s story! Have an inspiring weekend!

It Is Not What’s Gone – But What’s Given

Not too long ago a little girl in my neighborhood was born without a hand. She was born just after my own second daughter Ella was born. Her parents were obviously shaken up. About a week later, I saw them at a neighborhood function and they came over to me and asked what my thoughts were, if I had any advice, for them and for their daughter. My advice? This is their daughter’s life and they were asking my advice? Talk about humbling. What do you say? I had nothing very smart to say.

I told myself I wouldn’t let that happen again. That it was important that I could share what I have learned.

I’ve learned that there are millions of people out there ignoring disabilities and accomplishing incredible feats. I learned that you can learn to do things differently, but do them just as well. I’ve learned that it’s not the disability that defines you, it’s how you deal with the challenges the disability presents you with. I’ve learned that we have an obligation to the abilities we do have, not the disability.

I was born without my right hand. I have never felt slighted. As a kid I was pretty coordinated and growing up I loved sports. I learned to play baseball like most kids, playing catch with my Dad in the front yard. The only difference was that we had to come up with a method to throw and catch with the same hand. What we came up with, is basically what I continued to do my whole life. I used to practice by pretending to be my favorite pitchers. I’d throw a ball against a brick wall on the side of our house, switching the glove off and on, moving closer to the wall- forcing myself to get that glove on faster and faster. I imagined myself becoming a successful athlete.

Growing up, sports were my way of gaining acceptance. I guess somewhere deep inside I was thinking if I was good enough on the field then maybe kids wouldn’t think of me as being so different. Honestly I hid behind sports. I wanted the attention that comes from being successful, but I was very reluctant to draw any attention to my disability You know it’s funny, there was an article in the L.A. Times recently about a high school pitcher who has been doing very well— despite missing one hand. He mentioned my name as an example but went on to say he didn’t want to be like me, he wanted to be like Randy Johnson. At first my feelings were hurt, but then I understood. That’s exactly the same way I felt growing up. I didn’t want to be defined by a disability. Focus on my pitching and not my hand.

I loved throwing a baseball. It is so important to find something in life you feel crazy about. Because you are so passionate you naturally practice, the hard work that it takes to do something well will come easily.

You know how it worked out. I got to play baseball at the University of Michigan, 2 United States teams The 1987 Pan American team and the 1988 United States Olympic team. Even though I played in the major leagues for almost 10 years the Olympics are still one of my favorite memories.

You know in my career I once won 18 games in a year, I also lost 18 games in one year. I was fortunate enough to go straight from the Olympic team to the major leagues. Never spending a day in the minors. I was also sent down to the minor leagues after 8 years in the big leagues. In 1996 I went 2-18 with a 7 run era . I couldn’t get anyone out. I was in the first year of a long term contract with a team near my home. It was supposed to be easy. That following year I was fired. Drove back to California, crying all the way. I spent that summer up in Michigan hurting and wondering if my career was over. Somewhere deep inside I wasn’t sure. So I called the Chicago White Sox for a try out.

They gave me a chance to pitch again. I would watch the major leagues on t.v. with the rest of those kids and it felt like a million miles away. That had been my life. I was away from my family who I know thought I was crazy. Then I got the call I was going to Chicago back to the show. That was the good news, bad news your facing the Yankees Sat. night. They were about 100 and 15 at the time. I went on to win that game against the Yankees that night. In fact I went 5-0 the rest of that Sept.

I would like to tell those parents back in my neighborhood how wonderful my own parents were, and are. They encouraged me to participate, but didn’t dwell on every move I made. I don’t ever remember a concession to the fact that I had one hand. Maybe even a little more was expected. I will always be thankful that they never allowed my hand to be used as an excuse.

I would like to tell that little girl, “Go out and find what it is that you love. It may not be the most obvious choice or the most logical but never let that stop you.” Baseball was hardly the most the most logical choice for someone with one hand, but I loved it, so that’s what I pursued. No matter where the road takes you don’t give up until you know in your heart you done everything you possibly could to make your dreams come true. You owe nothing to disability, ignore it. When you fail, get back up and try again. Leave no room for an excuse. Don’t listen to what you can’t do. 99% of the time I never think of missing a hand. I have never been envious of someone with two hands. Listen to that voice deep within you, it knows, when you’ve done your best.

Somehow when things are said and done there will be some accountability imagine someone coming up to you at the end of your life and saying “you’ve been given these talents what did you do with them.” There is a certain potential we owe it to ourselves to live up to. Work hard, don’t look back, celebrate the blessings in your life.

– Jim Abbott

Today’s inspirational story shared from the following website: http://www.aboutonehandtyping.com/storiesfolder/jimabbottnotgone.html

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The Heart of a Man…

It’s not the size of a man but the size of his Heart that matters Evander HolyfieldToday has been a busy day filled with lots to do and (thankfully!) the energy to do it all!Therefore, I am going to keep my comments brief! I hope you are having a wonderful day and that you are inspired by today’s story!

Big Feet and Big Heart

It was an unseasonably hot day. Everybody it seemed, was looking for some kind of relief, so an ice cream store was a natural place to stop.

A little girl, clutching her money tightly, entered the store. Before she could say a word, the store clerk sharply told her to get outside and read the sign on the door, and stay out until she put on some shoes. She left slowly, and a big man followed her out of the store.

He watched as she stood in front of the store and read the sign: ‘No Bare Feet’. Tears started rolling down her cheeks as she turned and started to walked away. Just then the big man called to her. Sitting down on the curb, he took off his size-12 shoes, and set them in front of the girl saying, “Here, you won’t be able to walk in these, but if you sort of slide along, you can get your ice cream cone.”

Then he lifted the little girl up and set her feet into the shoes. “Take your time,” he said, “I get tired of moving them around, and it’ll feel good to just sit here and eat my ice cream.” The shining eyes of the little girl could not be missed as she shuffled up to the counter and ordered her ice cream cone.

He was a big man, all right. Big belly, big shoes, but most of all, he had a big heart.

Story shared from the following website: http://www.skywriting.net/inspirational/stories/big_feet-big_heart.html

 

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All About Heaven…Things You Need to Know

If we find ourselves with a desire  that nothing in this world can  satisfy, the most probable  explanation is that we were  made for another world   C.S. LewisHave you ever felt homesick for a place when you can’t even remember ever being there? Have you ever felt homesick for heaven?

Prior to my near-death experience, I would feel homesick from time to time for something that I knew existed though it seemed like I was homesick for a dream. I know now that what I was homesick for was heaven.

I understand the reasons behind our heavenly amnesia – we would all be incredibly miserable if we had full recall of the heavenly home that was ours before mortality. I also understand that despite God’s loving protectiveness over our past memories, our hearts still have the ability to sense the realm that we once were a part of and that we are invited to return to.

As Pierre Teilhard de Chardin so aptly said, “We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience.”
I hope that your heart speaks to you of heaven and our Creator. I promise you that they are real. This life is a precious growth opportunity! I hope you will cherish each day you are given to grow and to learn! And I hope that God will be a part of each of those days!
Please enjoy today’s story!:

The Hand Of God

By Joseph J. Mazzella • April 23, 2013

I think that most of us go through our days here with our eyes half-closed because we so seldom see the Hand of God working in our lives. It happens in countless ways every single day. Let me give you an example. Two years ago several of the Hawaiian shirts that I love to wear had become worn and threadbare. I really wanted some new ones so I saved any extra money I had for several weeks to pay for them. Finally, I headed to my favorite clothing store with a large denomination bill in my wallet to buy them.

When I got to the store I saw a local charity collecting money for the poor. I reached in my wallet for a five dollar bill to help them out. I grabbed it and dropped it in the bucket. As I let go of it, however, I noticed that it wasn’t the five dollar bill but rather the large denomination one that I had saved to pay for my new shirts. I went back home disappointed at my mistake, but I quickly made peace with it. I knew I could wear my old shirts for a while longer and it felt good knowing I was helping to buy food and clothes for people in desperate need.

The next week I stopped by the local Goodwill store to make a donation when I noticed several Hawaiian shirts brightening up the clothing racks. I went through them and picked out enough to last me a long while for a fraction of the price I would have paid for new ones. It made me laugh and smile when I realized that God had given me all I needed and also helped me to help others as well. I thanked Him for guiding my hand and for guiding my heart that day.

Saint Francis of Assisi said: “While we have time, let us do good!” Do all the good you can then in the days you are given here. Give all the help you can. Share all the love you can. Spread all the joy you can. Scatter all the sunshine you can. Utter all the truth you can. And don’t be surprised if the unseen Hand of God sometimes helps you out along the way.

Story shared from the following website: http://www.sunnyskyz.com/feel-good-story/173/The-Hand-of-God

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Follow Your Heart….

Pursue what catches your heart, not what catches your eyes Roy T. BennettIn my experience, the heart is not given its due respect. As the recipient of a host of various experiences involving the heart and my Creator, I believe that not only is the heart vital for knowing and understanding God – it is also of prime importance in understanding ourselves.

In today’s complex world of technology and insistent demands, it can be so easy to quit listening to our hearts. Yet, that is exactly where all of the answers are that we need!

Our hearts can tell us what our true passions are as well as provide answers from God, himself.

However, the heart does not shout and it does not demand attention. In order to get the full benefit of our heart, it must be listened to. In order to listen, we must allow ourselves quiet time, time to reflect, and time to commune with God.

If you want peace and joy in your life – make time to listen to your heart! I know that you will be blessed for doing so!

Instead of an inspirational story today, I found a poem that I wanted to share. I hope you enjoy!

Follow Your Heart

Although it’s been said many

times before

It’s a powerful message, so I’ll

say it once more…

Follow your heart, go wherever

it may lead,

Follow your heart and you’re

sure to succeed!

For when you follow your heart

and do what you love,

God gives you guidance and help

from above…

And things start to happen that

you never thought could,

And dreams come true…that you

never thought would!

For God’s given each of us a

special part to play…

So follow your heart and you

won’t be led astray!

©Faye Kilday 2000

Today’s poem is shared from the following website: http://www.inspirationalstories.com/poems/follow-your-heart-faye-diane-kilday-poem/

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