Overcoming Depression: Let Music Be Your Friend

Stay close to any sounds that make you glad you are alive HafizI don’t think that anyone would be surprised to learn of the power that music has to alleviate symptoms of depression. What surprises me is how little those with depression use music to help elevate their mood and overcome their mental illness.

I am inspired by the work of D. Masaru Emoto. Dr. Emoto’s work with water crystals might inspire you, as well! Up to 60% of our bodies are made of water. I believe that Dr. Emoto’s work with water crystals applies to us! We are impacted by our thoughts and the music we surround ourselves with.

Today, I am including a YouTube video of Dr. Emoto’s work as well as an article that explains the power of music. I hope you will watch and learn and incorporate the power of positive music and thoughts into your life!:

Amazing Power of Music Revealed

More than 7,000 runners who raced earlier this month in a half-marathon in London were under the influence of a scientifically derived and powerful performance-enhancing stimulant — pop music.

The dance-able, upbeat music at London’s “Run to the Beat” race was selected on the basis of the research and consultation of sport psychologist Costas Karageorghis of Brunel University in England. He has learned how to devise soundtracks that are just as powerful, if not more so, as some of the not-so-legal substances that athletes commonly take to excel.

“Music is a great way to regulate mood both before and during physical activity. A lot of athletes use music as if it’s a legal drug,” Karageorghis told LiveScience. “They can use it as a stimulant or as a sedative. Generally speaking, loud upbeat music has a stimulating effect and slow music reduces arousal.”

The link between music and athletic performance is just one example of the inroads scientists and doctors are making into understanding the amazing power that music has over our minds and bodies. Science is backing up our intuition and experience, showing that music really does kill pain, reduce stress, better our brains and basically change how we experience life.

Music reduces stress

For example, more and more health professionals, including pediatrician Linda Fisher at Loyola University Hospital in Illinois, are playing therapeutic music for patients in hospitals, hospices and other clinical settings to improve their healing.

“The music I play is not necessarily familiar,” said Fisher, who is finishing up coursework toward certification as a music-for-healing practitioner. “It’s healing music that puts the patient in a special place of peace as far as the music’s rhythm, melodies and tonal qualities.”

Studies done in the early 1990s at Bryan Memorial Hospital in Lincoln, Neb., and St. Mary’s Hospital in Mequon, Wis., concluded music “significantly” lowered the heart rates and calmed and regulated the blood pressures and respiration rates of patients who had undergone surgery.

In 2007, a study in Germany found that music therapy helped improve motor skills in patients recovering from strokes, Fisher said. Other studies have found that music therapy can boost the immune system, improve mental focus, help control pain, create a feeling of well-being and greatly reduce anxiety of patients awaiting surgery.

Along those lines, music therapy was recently found to reduce psychological stress in a study of 236 pregnant women, according to researchers from the College of Nursing at Kaohsiung Medical University in Taiwan.

Women in the study who listened to pre-recorded CDs of soothing music for 30 minutes daily showed significant reductions in stress, anxiety and depression, said researcher Chung-Hey Chen, who is now based at the National Cheng Kung University.

One of the CDs featured songs such as Brahms’ “Lullaby” and “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.” Nature sounds, children’s rhymes and songs and music by composers such as Beethoven and Debussy were featured on the other CDs. The results are detailed in a special issue The Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Music makes life better overall

Scientists also have confirmed that music definitely provokes memories, as we all have experienced, to the point where we don’t even have to hear a song. We just think of it and the memories flood in.

Music has also been found to ease labor pain, reduce the need for sedation during surgery, make you smarter, and diminish depression.

The right temporal lobe could be a key brain site for processing music, as one study found that subjects experience increased activity there when focusing on musical harmony. Other studies have also shown that the temporal lobe, in concert with the frontal lobe, is a key region for understanding certain musical features.

And while humans like to run to a beat, fish apparently also have their own version of this. In fact, the ability to keep track of time is fundamental to the behavior and cognitive processing of all living organisms, Mu-ming Poo of the University of California, Berkeley, wrote in the Oct. 16 issue of the journal Nature.

Among zebrafish, a neural “metronome” or biological clock may help them to remember rhythm over relatively long time periods, Poo and his colleagues found. When the beat stops, the fish apparently “remember” the beat’s rhythm and timing and often continue to wag their tails in time to it.

This finding and other research suggests that our ability and tendency to keep time with music is something we inherited from our earliest evolutionary ancestors.

More about music and workouts

For all you gym rats, here is exactly what listening to music does for your workout, Karageorghis said. First, it reduces your perception of how hard you are working by about 10 percent during low-to-moderate intensity activity. (During high intensity activity, music doesn’t work as well because your brain starts screaming at you to pay attention to physiological stress signals).

Secondly, music can have a profound influence on mood, potentially elevating the positive aspects of mood, such as vigor, excitement and happiness, and reducing depression, tension, fatigue, anger and confusion.

Thirdly, music can be used to set your pace — Ethiopian runner Haile Gebrselassie reportedly has asked for the techno song “Scatman” to be played when he competes (he won the gold medal in the 10,000 meters at the Sydney Olympic Games in 2000; “Scatman” presumably went unplayed during the race).

Finally, music can be used to overcome fatigue and control one’s emotions around competition. The hurdler Edwin Moses, who competed for the United States in the 70s and 80s and had a 122-race winning streak between 1987 and 1997, used laid-back soul tunes as part of his pre-race routine, Karageorghis said.

The “Run to the Beat” music was played as runners at the Oct. 5 half-marathon event passed by 17 stations, not throughout the 13.1-mile course, because Karageorghis’ research shows that music is most effective when we are losing steam, not as a constant stimulus. For the rest of us at the gym or on our a.m. jogs, he recommends two workouts with music to every one without, so the effect is not dulled.

Sports-music fusion festivals

Karageorghis and his post-doctoral researcher collected data during the “Run to the Beat” half-marathon, allowing them to test theories on thousands of live runners outside the lab.

Despite driving winds and heavy rain during the event, post-race interviews suggested that the runners found the music inspiring and fun.

In the future, Karageorghis envisions cultural festivals that involve a fusion of sports and music, where the crowd and the athletes are motivated by music playing at stations along a competitive route, while motivating one another.

“It is beyond the music,” he said. “The music creates an esprit de corps, a cohesion you don’t normally have in a mass participation event. One of the key causes of motivation is this notion of satisfaction of a psychological need for relatedness. Having music creates a common bond, a social gel, that allows you to almost satisfy this need automatically.”

Today’s article is shared from the following website: https://www.livescience.com/2953-amazing-power-music-revealed.html

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Overcoming Depression – Creating an Attitude of Gratitude Part 3

There’s no happier person than a truly Thankful, content person Joyce Meyer

This week, in an effort to help others overcome depression, I am focusing on gratitude. There are several steps for overcoming depression and gratitude is an essential step.

Just think how happy you would be if your sole intent was to find the negative in everything you encounter. (Not Very right?) Yet, that is what some do – not intentionally but from thought patterns that they have developed over time.

Is there a co-worker who drives you crazy? Are you constantly fussing about your children’s cleanliness habits or lack of? What about those inconsiderate ways of your spouse or family member? Are you concerned that you are always getting the fuzzy end of the lollipop? Has some incredible trauma been a part of your life?

During my near-death experience, I saw the reverence, love, and honor that everyone had for each other in heaven. Other than God, no one was perfect but everyone radiated an air of love and goodwill. Everyone celebrated the good in each other and genuinely supported each other. I believe there is a lesson there. I walked away from my near-death experience with a greater understanding of what make heaven heaven.

We are on earth now, having a mortal experience. There is an important purpose for mortality. We have come to learn, grow, and improve. We have come to develop faith. We are no longer surrounded and enveloped by God’s love, as we were in heaven, but we can choose to love, honor, and reverence each other on earth as well. It is not easy work but it is work that our lives will be blessed for.

If you would like to overcome depression or just improve your life, you must develop an attitude of gratitude! Our thoughts and emotions are powerful things. So powerful, they can help heal us or help make us ill. There is a book, published in 1995, that speaks powerfully to the power of thoughts and emotions, etc. making us ill. It is called the 22 Non-Negotiable Laws of Wellness by Greg Anderson. It is a wonderful book! Whether you are suffering from depression or any other illness, it is worth your time and effort to read! Greg Anderson was diagnosed with terminal cancer (a second time) and then studied the patterns and changes made by individuals who had survived terminal illnesses. As you might have guessed, he adopted those changes himself and has lived to teach others about how to heal and overcome illness (even terminal ones).

I hope you will take the time to read Greg Anderson’s book! I also hope that you will work to increase your gratitude! Today’s article shares more information on how to have an attitude of gratitude! I hope you enjoy!:

How to Have an Attitude of Gratitude

It is that time of year when giving thanks is top of mind. The holiday season, and Thanksgiving in particular, causes us to think about all of the special things in our lives and express gratitude for them. This is a favorite time of year for many, in large part because we are surrounded by loved ones and visibly reminded of all that we have to be grateful for.

If you’re like me, you wish this feeling could last all year long. Just imagine feeling proud, thankful, and joyful on an ongoing basis, not only during the holiday season.

A major step in that direction is developing an “Attitude of Gratitude,” according to New York Times best-selling author Lewis Howes. Howes writes extensively about cultivating a grateful mindset in his highly-inspirational new book, The School of Greatness. As Howes simply says, “Life is better if you develop an attitude of gratitude.”

But what exactly does that mean and how do we do it?

An attitude of gratitude means making it a habit to express thankfulness and appreciation in all parts of your life, on a regular basis, for both the big and small things alike. As Howes puts it, “If you concentrate on what you have, you’ll always have more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you’ll never have enough.”

Here is a menu of tactics (just pick a few!) he endorses to help develop this mindset:

  • Wake up every day and express to yourself what you are grateful for
  • Tell whoever you are with at the end of the day the 3 things you are most grateful for
  • Tell whoever you are with right now (significant other, friend, family member, etc.) the 3 things that you are most grateful for in this moment
  • Start a gratitude journal – Express gratitude in this journal every night by noting the things that you are grateful for, proud of, and excited about
  • Acknowledge yourself for what you have done and accomplished in the last day/week/month/year. Instead of comparing yourself to others, give yourself credit for the big and small things you have been doing!
  • Acknowledge other people and thank them for inspiring/helping/supporting you – oftentimes people wait their whole lives to be acknowledged (and yet it happens far too infrequently)!

If the gratitude process is hard to get started, begin by asking yourself, “What could I be grateful for?”, and see if the ideas start to flow. This is a mindset habit that is recommended by Tony Robbins in his book, Awaken the Giant Within.

Every day won’t be perfect, but focusing on what we are grateful for tends to wash away feelings of anger and negativity.

And in addition to improving mood, recent studies show that feeling and expressing gratitude leads to better physical health as well. Paul Mills, a Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, conducted studies that looked at the role of gratitude on heart health.

Among other things, he found that participants who kept a journal most days of the week, writing about 2-3 things they were grateful for (everything from appreciating their children to travel and good food), had reduced levels of inflammation and improved heart rhythm compared to people who did not write in a journal. And the journal-keepers also showed a decreased risk of heart disease after only 2 months of this new routine!

So try adopting some of the above tactics, even just one or two, in order to develop an overall grateful mindset. It takes a bit of work, but having an attitude of gratitude is one of the most impactful habits for a fulfilling and healthy life.

Today’s article was written by Andrew Merle and is shared from the following website: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrew-merle/how-to-have-an-attitude-of-gratitude_b_8644102.html

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Life with God…Is a Path to Peace

Life with God is not immunity from difficulties, but peace in difficulties   C.S. LewisI know that it might sound crazy but life can be PEACEFUL in spite of challenges and problems.

Life will never be free of challenges…at least for very long!

Challenge and growth is the thing that life is meant to be made of!

It has been my experience, that as I have made a continual place for God in my life, He has blessed me peace and strength no matter what the storms are that sweep through my life.

I hope that continual peace will be a part of your life!

I hope you enjoy today’s story!

Finding Peace Underwater by Brooke Obie

Have you ever been away on a trip only to be consumed by the worries you thought you’d left behind?

On a press trip to stunning Cap Cana, Dominican Republic, I found myself on the balcony of a suite at AlSol Tiara overlooking the ocean–and completely unable to stop thinking about family troubles back at home. My uncle had been the victim of a violent crime and was recovering in the hospital. My grandmother, who’s been in hospice for months, seemed to worsen with the news of my uncle’s hospitalization.

I’d tried to pray, let it go and enjoy the beauty that surrounded me on all sides on this magical island I’d never visited before. But whoever said, “you can’t pray and worry,” hasn’t met me; I’d gotten the contradictory act down to an art as our press group visited Blue Marlin restaurant where I dined on anxiety and the best seafood risotto I’d ever tasted. Worry followed me up on stage as our group sang “Lean on Me” together at Al Sol’s karaoke night. It trailed behind me as we hiked through Cap Cana’s natural theme park Scape Park and it waded in the spring water next to me when I took a dip in the park’s magical cenote.

I knew there was nothing I could do to heal my uncle or my grandmother any faster, and as I watched the sun set over the waves from my room each night, I could feel the enjoyment of my trip away from the city rolling out to sea. I tried to clear my mind with meditation, my favorite form of prayer, to ease my worry.

In the warm night air, listening to the calming sounds of the ocean, I sat still, closed my eyes and tried to concentrate on the sound of my breath. Breath is God’s first gift to humans, the evidence of life. If I could only focus on my breathing, on that precious gift from God, I’d have no space in my head to be overcome with worry. I fidgeted the whole time, unable to sit still. After about 2 minutes of trying, I got up from the balcony, left the roaring waves behind and called to check on my grandmother again.

On the last day of my trip, our press group went out to sea for a boat cruise. Our tour guides had found a spot in the middle of the ocean, far away from shore that happened to only be about 6 feet deep. We stopped there to do some snorkeling. I put on my gear and dived into the water. Instantly, my ears filled up with water, blocking out all sound. The only thing that echoed in my ears was the bubbling of my own breath. I watched the bubbles form in front of me and became far more fascinated by them than the tiny coral ecosystems we were swimming over. I stared in awe at the bubbles, my ears were filled with the sound of my breathing.

Finally, underwater, my mind was clear, my worry evaporated, and I was filled with the kind of gratitude that brings peace. In those unexpected moments of meditation, all I could do was surrender. All was well and all would be well. I still had breath in my body and so did my uncle and grandmother. That miraculous gift was enough.

Story shared from the following website” https://www.guideposts.org/better-living/travel/finding-peace-underwater

 

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Serenity and Finding Peace in Your Life

Serenity is invaluable and it comes with a price; the price of self-control. Serenity and Peace are similar. Both are priceless.

I love the writings of James Allen, the author of As A Man Thinketh. The writings and thoughts of James Allen are as valid and wonderful today as they were 100 years ago.  When writings endure well the test of time, it often because they are based on eternal truth.

Peace and Serenity are always available to us if we are willing to utilize the truths that promote them. Namely, seeking God and aligning our hearts and choices with His eternal laws.

Our personal thoughts are powerful. They determine our actions and they determine the kind of life we will build. We are each born with the Personal Power to control our thoughts and our destiny. It is not always easy to learn to use the personal power of our thoughts but it always remains within our grasp to do so.

This is one of the truths I witnessed during my near-death experience. However, you don’t have to have a near-death experience to know what I know. You can know in your heart that what I say is true by praying to God and asking Him to confirm this truth to you.

It is my prayer that each day of your life will be blessed with God’s presence in it. I hope you will read the thoughts I share from James Allen today and find positive influence from his words!

Serenity by James Allen

Calmness of mind is one of the beautiful jewels of wisdom. It is the result of long and patient effort in self-control. Its presence is an indication of ripened experience, and of a more than ordinary knowledge of the laws and operations of thought.

A person becomes calm in the measure that one understands themselves as a thought evolved being, for such knowledge necessitates the understanding of others as the result of thought, and as one develops a right understanding, and sees more and more clearly the internal relations of things by the action of cause and effect, one ceases to fuss and fume and worry and grieve, and remains poised, steadfast, serene.

The calm person, having learned how to govern themselves, knows how to adapt themselves to others; and they, in turn, reverence their spiritual strength, and feel that they can learn of them and rely upon them. The more tranquil a person becomes, the greater is their success, their influence, their power for good. Even the ordinary trader will find their business prosperity increase as one develops a greater self control and equanimity, for people will always prefer to deal with a person whose demeanor is strongly equable.

The strong, calm person is always loved and revered. They are like a shade-giving tree in a thirsty land, or a sheltering rock in a storm. Who does not love a tranquil heart, a sweet-tempered, balanced life? It does not matter whether it rains or shines, or what changes come to those possessing these blessings, for they are always sweet, serene, and calm. That exquisite poise of character which we call serenity is the last lesson of culture; it is the flowering of life, the fruitage of the soul. It is precious as wisdom, more to be desired than gold, than even fine gold. How insignificant mere money seeking looks in comparison with a serene life – a life that dwells in the ocean of truth, beneath the waves, beyond the reach of tempests, in the eternal calm!

How many people we know who sour their lives, who ruin all that is sweet and beautiful by explosive tempers, who destroy their poise of character, and make bad blood! It is a question whether the great majority of people do not ruin their lives and mar their happiness by lack of self-control flow few people we meet in life who are well-balanced, who have that exquisite poise which is characteristic of the finished character!

Yes, humanity surges with uncontrolled passion, is tumultuous with ungoverned grief, is blown about by anxiety and doubt. Only the wise man, only he whose thoughts are controlled and purified, makes the winds and the storms of the soul obey him.

Tempest-tossed souls, wherever you may be, under whatever conditions you may live, know this: In the ocean of life the isles of blessedness are smiling and the sunny shore of your ideal awaits your coming. Keep your hands firmly upon the helm of thought. In the core of your soul reclines the commanding Master; He does but sleep; wake Him. Self-control is strength. Right thought is mastery. Calmness is power. Say unto your heart, “Peace. Be still.”

James Allen 1864-1912, Author

The writings of James Allen are shared from this website: great-inspirational-quotes.com

 

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