You Deserve Your Love…

You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and afftection. Buddha A lot has been written about Loving Yourself – also called self-esteem. More should be written. More anxiety, more depression, more sadness and more misery could be overcome just by an increase of loving ourselves.

Too many individuals talk to themselves using words and voices that they would not use on their worst enemy.

God does not want us to beat ourselves up…and loving our self is not the same as conceit.

We each are a divine gift to this world – a gift created by God and shared by him as well.

This weekend, I hope you will look into your heart – identify all of the garbage and have a soul cleaning. You deserve to have joy and you deserve to be loved! Yet, if you don’t truly love yourself, it is next to impossible to have healthy, loving relationships with others!

I hope you will give yourself a hug and a pat on the back for all of your good qualities and have patience with yourself on all of those things you need to work on.

Have a wonderful weekend and enjoy today’s story!

This Uplifting Story Proves You Can CHOOSE Your Mood

This story was originally published on HerAfter.com, a website for women that shares inspiring articles on self-improvement and advice on becoming your best. You can read the original here.

A few hours after my parents told me that I had cancer, I went to the movies.

It sounds strange, but I was 17, and all I could do was keep cancer from taking over my life. That effort would start with keeping it from ruining my afternoon. I had plans. To live, in fact, and I was going to go through with them. Naivety is such a blessing when it offers such unfounded courage.

So this was my 17-year-old logic for why I had no business sitting at home and crying about cancer when the world was waiting. A bright, bold world that I had known I wanted to be part of, and in the light of new risks, I wanted it even more. You can read the full story of my diagnosis here, but for now, let us digest these strange circumstances with open eyes:

First, that the power the mind has to control our mood is unlimited. We forget this when we’re confronted with priorities, stress, time constraints. But if you can tell a clueless 17 year old that her life is in danger, and she refuses to be scared, then I’m quite certain the possibilities for you are endless.

Second, that in these little moments of clarity, when all that truly matters becomes glaringly apparent, and a basis for our most natural and self-aware intentions come to light, we should show a little gratitude. We should be grateful that we have the foresight to remember what truly matters, especially in the face of great adversity. In this story, my clarity continued through the afternoon…

Standing in the mall downtown waiting for the show, I found myself in the center of the theater complex. People bustled from one side to the other, one store to the next. It was Christmas time, and so even more busy and chaotic than usual. Reality might have well been just a portrait in motion: just in front of me, dreamily, and not quite touchable. I stood, feet planted in the marble lobby of this massive building, words and energies swirling around like water colors, moving in currents in every direction. Everyone had wishes on their lips, and wants on their lists, a concern for everyone they loved attached to their wallets. But I couldn’t make out a single thing. It wasn’t that the room spun around me, but still I became the center of it. Or maybe centered by it, the room and the world all around me in every direction.

 

This was the second truly profound moment of stillness — the first being while my parents told me the diagnosis, and I realized I could interject with “No, I’m not going to be scared.” Those little pockets of silence, the energy vibrating in pulses through your bones. The mind unattached and determined.

I know that you know the feeling. It’s waiting just at the moment when your tears take a pause. Or just after you’ve jumped into the lake, free floating just under the surface, and all stands still right before you come gasping up for air. Or right after the words “it’s over“ have left his mouth, and you’re not sure what to say, now that you’ve heard the words you were most afraid to hear…

Have you noticed that little pause? That little quiet moment that the universe gives you, like a hush across all the world. When you can see, even within the deepest pain, that the world still continues to spin around you, but you’re given a moment of total stillness…

This is what 17-year-old me was realizing, brave and hopeful. All a person can do is realize your physical presence, from head to do, and all the space around you that extends endlessly in every direction. Don’t worry about the past, don’t fret about the future. For now, just stand still, and breathe deeply, because THAT is your moment to choose.

In my moment, I’m just a girl, a girl who’s very sick, but a girl who’s right here right now, and is certain of what she’ll attempt to do. Though all this time I thought I understood everything about the world in a manageable way, but in truth all I am is a single entity. Really, I am just standing, pulsating, watching the water colors fly by, and thankfully the world is giving just a brief break in the chaos to help me look outward… Oh what a gift it truly is.

These still moments are just proof life’s endless love for us. A quiet little pocket in which we’re given the power to choose any one direction: fear, anger, hope, bravery, forgiveness, love. These little moments that we experience all alone, whether painful or joyful, are gifts that remind us the power we have to write our life’s story. And of the moment we are living in, a moment always in motion.

So much of our time and energy is absorbed with reaching for what we want to be, or fleeing from what we hope we aren’t. Whenever I’m online pinning for inspiration, I can see it. All the positive messages emblazoned on mugs and t-shirts and Instagram photos. All these words to remind us to work hard and keep focused, and how capable we are of getting to where we want to be! Oh if only it were as easy as a mug on our desk to make us a hero of our own lives!

But silence speaks the truth. It so softly whispers of our power to choose our mood, our action and our reaction. When we listen, listen listen… sometimes only because we’re begging the moment to move faster and end already, but it doesn’t… We realize this moment: Here we are. Right here right now, reading this, sharing my story with yours. And all the happy mug messages of “she believed she could and she did” don’t make any sense anymore. Because all “now” can say to us is “there she is.” And all we can say back is “okay here, right now, that is where I’ll start from…”

It’s ever a journey onward, whether facing backwards or forward. The moment is always moving. But when you get the gift of sudden stillness, or better yet if you can train yourself to stop, take a look around, and put yourself at center again, you’ll open your eyes and hearts to much more than you ever thought possible…

 

Embrace your power to choose your mood in three simple steps:

 

 

  • STOP

Take a breath in. Freeze the thoughts that are coming in — the fears, the anxieties, the worries, the excitements. Just stop and be still and let the breath be your focus.

  • LOOK AROUND

What is really happening right now? Not the fears of what you think might happen, not the worries about the future. What’s really happening? Regardless of the fight you’re in or the situation you’re trying to solve, what is really tangible here, now, with you?

  • LISTEN

What does your heart say? What feels right? What is the reaction your highest self would offer? Give your trust to the wisdom of life, and stop trying to over-plan what happens next too much. Have faith that the answers are presenting themselves even as you try to invent them, and let yourself be a channel for whatever life might have in store for you…

And, most sobering of all, please ask yourself:

What would your entire life look like if you embraced the power to CHOOSE your attitude, your mood, and your reactions, rather than let fear or doubt run your life?

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Being Your Own Self – You Are an Important Individual!

Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one. Eleanor RooseveltI suppose that it only makes sense that when a person is passionate about something – they will talk about it a lot. I don’t have a specific theme for this blog. Instead, it is my hope and desire to teach others about what I learned in heaven (did I just give my blog a theme?)

I have mentioned it before, but here goes: We were all amazing in that realm we call heaven! Even more important: We were not clones of each other there either. We were unique individuals with unique sets of gifts and talents. Yet, in that realm, we honored each other and reverenced each other for who we were.

Can you imagine a classroom where the teacher loves and adores each student perfectly and where each student is honored for their abilities regardless of how unique they were? Can you imagine each student being perfectly instructed according to their unique needs and gifts? I can because I saw it in heaven. God was that perfect teacher.

I know I will repeat it again and again but heaven taught me more about life and what it is meant to look like than life will ever teach me. It is that instruction that I hope to share with the world.

Today, I share a blog post written by Amy Anderson on Eleanor Roosevelt. Eleanor made her mark on the world by being herself and being true to her heart. I hope you enjoy!:

Profiles in Greatness – Eleanor Roosevelt

by Amy Anderson

“Do what you feel in your heart to be right—for you’ll be criticized anyway.” Eleanor Roosevelt spoke these words from experience. During her years in public service, she was often criticized for her progressive and democratic opinions. While her husband, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was initiating the New Deal policies that would enable the nation to recover from the Great Depression, Eleanor was breaking ground in race relations, women’s rights and international diplomacy. Her words of wisdom and determination are still an inspiration to Americans of all ages.

“I think I have a good deal of my Uncle Theodore in me, because I could not, at any age, be content to take my place by the fireside and simply look on.”

Eleanor Roosevelt was born in 1884 in New York City to a wealthy family with a firm position in New York high society. But her childhood was anything but idyllic. After her mother died from diphtheria in 1892 and her father died from complications from alcoholism in 1894, young Eleanor and her surviving siblings were sent to live with their maternal grandmother. She was educated at an English finishing school by a progressive feminist educator, who enhanced Eleanor’s self-confidence and social grace.

At 17, while her uncle Theodore Roosevelt was serving as president of the United States, Eleanor met her distant cousin, Franklin. They married in 1905 and later had six children. Franklin Roosevelt first gave his famous fireside chats while was governor of New York in 1929. He later used them to great success as a way to reach a wide radio audience during his presidency. While Eleanor often agreed with her husband’s policies, she was not a passive bystander, as her aunt had been during Theodore Roosevelt’s terms in the White House. Instead, she made a name for herself a public reformer in her own right.

“You get more joy out of the giving to others, and should put a good deal of thought into the happiness you are able to give.”

When Eleanor’s husband entered the political arena, she was a great ally in his efforts to institute reform while winning both public and political approval. In 1921, Franklin suffered a paralytic illness, and she committed herself to his care. She also began serving as his stand-in at public appearances, helping maintain his status in the Democratic Party.

During the 1920s, Eleanor began working with the Women’s Trade Union League to raise money in support of its goals, which included a 48-hour workweek, minimum wage and the abolition of child labor. Her prominent standing with Democratic women helped her husband gain their support and win the governor’s race in New York. Meanwhile, Eleanor taught literature and American history at the Todhunter School for Girls in New York City.

 “One’s philosophy is not best expressed in words; it is expressed in the choices one makes. In the long run, we shape our lives and we shape ourselves.”

Throughout the 1920s, she engaged in an active speaking agenda, an unusual role for a woman at that time and unprecedented for a first lady. She spoke out in favor of labor unions, racial equality and women’s rights. Her business- and social-reform activities after the Roosevelts moved into the White House. Eleanor was the first lady to hold weekly press conferences for female journalists, and she wrote a syndicated column called “My Day.”

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”

The FBI file on Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the largest in J. Edgar Hoover’s collection. He was suspicious of her affiliation with liberal groups like the American Youth Congress, her outspoken opposition to segregation and lynching and her staunch support of free speech. Her file contained records of her activities and correspondence, charges against her as a communist and even threats to her life.

Eleanor denounced Hoover’s methods and wrote angry letters protesting the FBI’s investigations of her friends and business associates. Her objections did not keep the file from growing; at the time of her death, it held more than 3,000 pages.

“One of the best ways of enslaving a people is to keep them from education.”

Eleanor was much more outspoken than her husband on the issue of racial equality. She was a strong supporter of improving education for African-Americans. Her activity for the civil rights movement included speaking engagements at African-American institutions and public support of the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II. She caused outrage among conservative groups when she appointed an African-American woman to be head of the Division of Negro Affairs.

Later, Eleanor was the first and, to date, the only first lady to receive honorary membership in the respected sorority for African- American women, Alpha Kappa Alpha.

“When you cease to make a contribution, you begin to die.”

Eleanor continued her efforts for social reform after her husband’s death in 1945. The following year, President Truman appointed her as a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly. She served as the chair for the U.N. Human Rights Commission that drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Roosevelt resigned her U.N. position in 1953.

But she continued to be active in politics well into her 70s. She was a strong supporter of the Kennedy-Johnson ticket in 1960 and later chaired the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. She was also appointed by President Kennedy to the National Advisory Committee of the Peace Corps.

Over her lifetime, Eleanor was awarded 35 honorary degrees and the United Nations Human Rights Prize. When she passed away in 1962, her memorial service was attended by President Kennedy and former Presidents Truman and Eisenhower. This woman, who had lived a life of privilege and heartache, had become one of the most admired figures in American history. As Adlai Stevenson said at her memorial, “She would rather light candles than curse the darkness, and her glow has warmed the world.”

Story shared from the following website: http://www.success.com/mobile/article/profiles-in-greatness-eleanor-roosevelt

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You are More Important than You Know!

We are more important than we know, stronger than we realize, and extraordinary in every way. He can see it, and I believe He wants us to see it too.  Michelle WilsonThere are so many things that I wish I could share (like in share a video or embed into the hearts of everyone who walks the earth) from my near-death experience. I wish everyone could know of the unfathomable love that God has for each of us. I wish that everyone could know of the divine and inherent gifts that are ours simply for being a child of God. I wish everyone could know of God’s complete and utter perfection. I wish that everyone could know in a ego-less  way how important we all are!

There are waaaaay too many people in this world who have been tricked into believing that they don’t matter, that they have no talents, or that you have to be wealthy, famous or a celebrity to make a difference. The truth is that we are all important and each of us makes an important impact on this world. We all recognize the impact others have on us but, somehow, many seem to miss the fact that we have an impact as well!

Think about the impact you have. Think about your importance! I am not talking arrogance or conceit here. I am talking about the the importance you have by virtue of being a member of the human race and a child of God. I am talking about the difference you make when you have a positive attitude or when you share a smile. I am talking about the day you make for someone else when you share a compliment or do a good deed. I am talking about the impact you have on family members, co-workers and loved ones just by the way you treat and talk to them!

Think about the gifts you have! Remember…gifts are not meant for keeping – they are meant for sharing!

I hope you will take a few minutes to think about the impact you can (an do) make on those around you! I hope as you read today’s story, you will recognize how important you are and gain a little better sense of the impact you have on those in your life!:

Late one afternoon in the San Jose, California, airport, people were milling around, waiting for the luggage to appear on the carousel, with few seats available for waiting. The usual airport noises added to the restlessness of the impatient travelers. A group of strangers, we were each interested in our own destinations.

Against the wall near the outside door, an elderly woman sat hunched over on one of the few benches in the waiting room, a couple of boxes tied with string tucked next to her feet. I moved over near her and watched. She seemed not to notice me. She wrung her frail hands, spotted with age, over and over again, while deep lines furrowed her face. Many people walked by with little notice as she kept a steady watch on the outside door.

Taking a few steps closer, I asked, “Could I be of any help to you?” She looked up, startled, then said, “I’m supposed to meet my daughter out in front. She said she would come and pick me up, but I don’t know where to go, and I can’t carry my things.”

Together we got through the big door with her packages and found a bench near the area where people were being picked up. I wondered how long she had been waiting, and if her daughter knew how frightened and unsure her mother was in this unfamiliar place. Might better arrangements have been made for this elderly woman who seemed so alone, frightened, and unsure? The anxious traveler slowly sat down once again and pulled her packages close to her. Looking up through her wire-rimmed glasses, she asked, “Who are you anyway? You must be somebody.”

I told her my name and then asked this stranger bent with age and the care of years, “Who are you?” “Oh, I’m nobody,” she said. Nobody? I thought. You’re somebody’s mother and you’re . . . At that moment a car pulled up, and a middle-aged woman in fine clothes got out of the driver’s seat and hurried toward the elderly woman. “That’s her. That’s my daughter,” the mother told me. . . .

Since that day in San Jose, I hear ringing in my ears a tired voice, saying, “Oh, I’m nobody.” Just how many nobodies are there in this world? And how many somebodies? And how do you tell the difference?

In London, England, on a beautiful day in April, that question popped into my mind again. We arrived at Heathrow Airport and took a taxi to our hotel by way of Buckingham Palace. It was three o’clock in the afternoon, and large numbers of people were moving toward the palace. As we rode down the street opposite the palace entrance, we saw uniformed policemen mounted on beautiful black horses. Lines of school children in navy uniforms with brass buttons, looking as official in their uniforms as the officers of the law, were carrying beautiful bouquets of bright yellow daffodils. “Surely this is not a regular occurrence,” I said, and the taxi driver informed me that it was a celebration for Queen Elizabeth’s birthday. The celebration was to begin at four o’clock, when the children would gather in front of the great palace and begin singing. Fifteen minutes later the Queen of England, Queen Elizabeth II, would appear on the balcony and everyone could participate in this historic event by singing happy birthday to her.

You can be sure that at four o’clock, I was at Buckingham Palace. I looked around at the people – young and old, poor and well-to-do. I watched as they stood with eyes riveted on the balcony, which was decorated with red, white, and blue bunting. At four o’clock the children began to sing. Fifteen minutes later a hush fell over the crowd. The balcony doors opened, and out stepped six uniformed buglers in fancy attire. They raised their instruments, with long banners hanging from each horn, and played a stirring fanfare. Then the people in the courtyard cheered as the queen came into view. She was dressed in a bright yellow suit, and as if by signal, the children waved their bright yellow daffodils and sang the special birthday song. The queen waved to the people, many of whom had tears in their eyes. There stood the Queen of England, a real somebody surrounded by her subjects, her kingdom, and her empire.

I supposed no one had ever asked Queen Elizabeth, “Who are you?” If they had done so, everyone could answer, “She is the Queen of England.” No more would need to be said.

Is it power and authority, popularity, prestige, and position that makes one a somebody? My mind raced by from the Buckingham Palace in London to the airport in San Jose, from the Queen of England to the elderly woman who told me, “Oh, I’m nobody.”

I wanted to tell the old woman in San Jose that she could become a queen. I wanted to tell her about the gospel of Jesus Christ. I wanted to tell the Queen of England that she too could become a queen – not just the Queen of England, but a queen forever in God’s kingdom.

As I watched the crowds of people at the Queen’s birthday, I wished I could stand on the balcony of Buckingham Palace and shout to every young woman within the sound of my voice, “You are a somebody!” I wish that I could talk to every young woman personally. I would say, “You are a daughter of a Heavenly Father who loves you and who has an eternal plan for you that is centered in Jesus Christ your Savior.” I would tell her that she has a divine nature and has inherited divine qualities…. No one is a nobody! Everyone is a somebody in our Heavenly Father’s kingdom! We are all daughters of God.

(Ardeth Greene Kapp, I Walk by Faith, [Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1987].)

Story shared from the following website: http://www.ldsliving.com/FHE-Divine-Nature/s/3791

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God’s Love is Infinite…

God’s love is infinite and it will endure forever, but what it means for each of us depends on how  we respond to His Love.  D. Todd Christofferson

I have come to understand a certain truth only after making sure that I did it the hard way. I have always believed God loved me. During my near-death experience, His love for me was unquestionable. Yet, even after my near-death experience, I found it a struggle at times to feel deserving of God’s love. I wasn’t doing anything bad – I just wasn’t allowing God’s love to truly bless my life.

Since my near-death experience, I have made a consistent effort to see myself as God sees me. I know that in mortality that will not really be possible but I also know amazing things are possible in mortality. It is because of God’s love for me and you and the fact that we are literally his children that we are capable of those amazing things!

It takes faith, but I have found that each time I step out and exercise faith and follow God’s guidance for me I am astounded with the results that come. I hope if you are not sure of God’s love for you that you will give faith in Him a try. I know you will be pleasantly surprised as well! While we cannot yet look into His face and see His love for us – we can experience what I like to call the tangibly intangible. God’s love is one of those tangibly intangible things that is meant to bless our lives!

Today I share a story that I think gives a sampler of what God’s love can do. I hope you enjoy!

THE MASTER’S HAND

Wishing to encourage her young son’s progress on the piano, a mother took the small boy to a Paderewski concert. After they were seated, the mother spotted a friend in the audience and walked down the aisle to greet her. Seizing the opportunity to explore the wonders of the concert hall, the little boy rose and eventually explored his way through a door marked “NO ADMITTANCE.”

When the house lights dimmed and the concert was about to begin, the mother returned to her seat and discovered that her son was missing. Suddenly, the curtains parted and spotlights focused on the impressive Steinway on stage. In horror, the mother saw her little boy sitting at the keyboard, innocently picking out “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” At that moment, the great piano master made his entrance, quickly moved to the piano, and whispered in the boy’s ear, “Don’t quit, keep playing.”

Then leaning over, Paderewski reached down with his left hand and began filling in a bass part. Soon his right arm reached around to the other side of the child and he added a running obligatio. Together, the old master and the young novice transformed a frightening situation into a wonderfully creative experience. The audience was mesmerized.

That’s the way it is with God. What we can accomplish on our own is hardly noteworthy. We try our best, but the results aren’t exactly graceful flowing music. But with the hand of the Master, our life’s work truly can be beautiful. Next time you set out to accomplish great feats, listen carefully. You can hear the voice of the Master, whispering in your ear, “Don’t quit, keep playing.” Feel His loving arms around you. Know that His strong hands are playing the concerto of your life. Remember, God doesn’t call the equipped, He equips the called.

– Author Unknown –

Story shared from the following website: http://godslittleacre.net/inspirationalstories/the_masters_hand.html

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Happy Valentine’s Day…Make Sure You Love Yourself Too!

Happy Valentine's Day! Make Sure You Love Yourself Too!

It may seem odd that I make a plea for you to love yourself on Valentine’s Day – the day when we make a point of sharing how much we love others. However, I find that many if not most people don’t realize that in order love others deeply and have healthy relationships with them, we must love ourselves first.

Love is a wonderful thing and not only does it make life worth living – it is the stuff eternity is made of as well! The love I felt in heaven denies words to describe – suffice it to say that the love I felt there was glorious, inspiring and enveloping.

It was in heaven that I truly learned about the importance of loving myself. I saw that I not only loved myself there, I honored myself. We loved ourselves and each other. We honored ourselves and each other. It was truly magnificent and inspiring! The love and honor I am speaking about had no conceit or arrogance to it – it was a deep understanding of our divinity, our worth and our worthiness to be loved.

I am not there yet, but I make it a daily quest to feel about myself in mortality the way I felt about myself as I witnessed my existence in heaven, prior to my birth here in this world.

We truly are divine spiritual beings! Our world needs us to love ourselves and to manifest our deepest abilities to love! I hope you will join me in being kind to ourselves! Give yourself a pat on the back! Identify and give yourself credit for your talents, gifts, and abilities! Look in the mirror and love the reflection you are seeing! You are literally a child of God and you deserved to me loved (by yourself and others)!

Happy Valentine’s Day! I hope you enjoy the blog post I share with you from Maria Shriver!:

Learning to Love Yourself by Maria Shriver

Do you love yourself?” If you were to approach me in early 2009 and ask me that question, it would’ve been blatantly obvious that I didn’t.

There I was, 20 years old, living a sedentary lifestyle at a whopping 230 lbs.

I didn’t communicate with myself and, as a matter of fact, I didn’t communicate with anyone. I allowed myself to be bullied into silence by my peer’s comments, which left me feeling completely ashamed and worthless to all walks of life.

Some days, I didn’t even want to get out of bed, nor did I feel like I had a reason for doing so. I self-medicated with food and my unhealthy eating habits spiraled out of control.

To rid me of this empty void within my heart and soul, I brainwashed myself into thinking that food was my only comfort in life.

But my hatred towards myself became so strong that I was completely oblivious to the fact that I was slowly killing myself with food…something whose purpose, ironically, is to aid in our survival.

It wasn’t until one night, in April of 2009, that I woke up and realized that it was time to make a change.

I was tired of having my quality of life go down as the numbers went up. I was tired of feeling breathless after hauling myself up a single flight of stairs.

I was tired of avoiding social gatherings because I was too embarrassed of my existence. Most importantly, I was tired of not living.

I had to wake up from this self-induced ‘coma’ that I put myself in. I was just a body comprised of fear, hatred, and sadness — a walking billboard for the hopeless.

Believe it or not, I came to terms with my food addiction and was inspired to change by watching The Biggest Loser. And after making necessary lifestyle changes, I successfully lost 110 lbs.

Unfortunately, I didn’t focus on my psychological well-being. I was still stricken with fear. I was chained to the scale, my life controlled by numbers.

After time, my inner strength began slipping through the cracks. Self-sabotage pushed me too far in the other direction and I found myself in the same deep depressive state that I was in at 230 lbs.

If I hadn’t met a runner in late 2010, I have no idea where I’d be today.

This avid runner I mention convinced me to sign up for my 1st race after showing genuine interest after testing my limits on the treadmill. The rest is history.

Now I can proudly call myself a 2x marathoner and an ultramarathoner 2 years later. Running has trained me to run the day, not let the day run me.

I put on my cape, chased my fears, and rescued myself. I am my hero. I am me. I am Adrian.

I’m not just a runner. I’m someone with a strong passion for life. Even when a gust of wind crosses my path, I will continue to keep my flame burning bright.

The best reward of this journey is being able to say ‘I love myself’ and actually mean it.

You all have the power to love yourself, too, and here’s what I’ve learned through much struggle:

1.) Change your vocabulary. What is the first negative thought that comes to your mind? It may be something along the lines of, “I can’t do this; I’m a failure!” Repeat your thought loud and clear for the entire world to hear. Come to terms with your negativity. Bottling up these intense feelings that you have towards yourself is unhealthy, whether it has to deal with doubt, lack of respect, and so forth.

Write this thought on a piece of paper, crumple it up, and toss it into the garbage. This thought can’t destroy you any longer! Like the old saying goes, out with the old and in with the new. Start saying the exact opposite; “I can do this; I will reach my goal!” Repeat this thought over and over again, ultimately locking it up inside of your head.

When you need a moment of self-affirmation, you now hold the key to release the positivity.

2.) Grab a pen, some paper and make a list. Write down your positive attributes, greatest abilities, and biggest accomplishments. Next, identify areas in your life that you feel need to be changed or improved. Once you’re fully aware of your strengths and weaknesses, you can come up with possible solutions to the latter of the two. Instead of dwelling on what you believe needs fixed, do something about it and stop making excuses to rationalize your behavior.

Prime example: “I failed this exam, so I’m obviously a loser. I’m going to give up now.” What should really be rolling through your mind is: “This too shall pass, and I will try harder next time. This is no time to give up because I’m much stronger than this.” A little belief in one’s self goes a long way.

You have to trust your journey and love yourself before anyone else can. Come to terms with underlying problems and do differently than what has failed in the past.

3.) Bring your “little voice” to the surface and really listen. The past is the past, and oftentimes, the little voice inside of our heads is merely a result of our past conditioning. It’s a bundle of experiences, could’ves, would’ves, should’ves, regrets, wishes, etc. Don’t let the past control your future. You hold the power to change your current situation for the better.

Your inner voice is only a wall, and that wall doesn’t have to be permanently erect. Bring your inner voice to the surface, actively listen, and dismantle any unnecessary fears that may pose a threat to your future success. Be the change that you wish to see in the world, even if it’s your world. Your world is no less important than anyone else’s, so don’t allow it to be.

“Once the caterpillar thought the world was over, it became a butterfly.” Sure ,the caterpillar was probably unhappy in it’s former state, but now it’s free to fly away and embrace the life that it was always destined to have.

It’s time to break through your cocoon and spread your wings. I’ll see you there when you do.

This blog post was made by Maria Shriver and is shared from the following website: http://mariashriver.com/blog/2013/02/learning-to-love-yourself-adrian-crouch/

 

 

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