What You Need to Succeed

The Key to Success is not through Achievement, but through ENTHUSIASM Malcolm Forbes

Photo by Alan Hurt Jr. on Unsplash

In the pitch-black night, stung by jellyfish, choking on salt water, singing to herself, hallucinating … Diana Nyad just kept on swimming. And that’s how she finally achieved her lifetime goal as an athlete: an extreme 100-mile swim from Cuba to Florida — at age 64. Hear her story.

Today’s inspiring Video was shared from Youtube.com

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How to Accomplish Your Life Mission

A man with money is no match against a man on a mission Doyle Brunson

We are a month into this New Year. How are your New Year’s resolutions coming? Are you finding your self-confidence or self-discipline lacking? If so, here’s a boost to get you going again. Remember…every day is a new day and winners always get back up after they fall! Here are some steps to take to get you back on track! Keep listening to your heart! Remember that that is where the Lord speaks to you. I know that if you don’t know it already, He is speaking to you right now – telling you that you have important things to do with your incredibly important life! Have a wonderful day!

Achieve Your Goals

To achieve balance in our life we need to set goals and make changes. That means self-investment and finding a system that works for us to achieve our goals. Follow this 6 step program to achieve your goals.

1. Define

What is it that you really want? What’s the goal that you want to achieve? It needs to be something that you’re committed to, not something that someone else wants or that you don’t really care about. If you’re going to invest in yourself then you need to invest in a goal that you, yourself want to achieve.

2. Commit

Agree your goal and commit to it. Make a pledge to yourself. Now write it down. Most people don’t write their goals down. But those that write their goals down are 95% more likely yo achieve them. Take the time to write them down. Commit to yourself.

3. Be Accountable

Now that you’ve committed and you’ve written your goals down, make yourself accountable. Get an accountability partner — someone that you can share your progress with. If you know you have to report back to someone at the end of each day on how you’re doing, you’re more likely to do it. Try sharing it on social media or blog about it too.

4. Start Small

Don’t jump in at the deep end. This is a marathon not a sprint. You want to achieve your goal and then carry it on as you improve your life. If you want to lose weight, you want to make sure the weight stays off at the end, not starve yourself for a few weeks and in a couple of months time put the weight back on again. (Note: I’m using simple examples of goals as an illustration but you should really consider making new life resolutions).

You need to make a habit. These habits are best formed by doing something small and often. If you’re eliminating something then put something in its place to help form this habit. If you’re trying to cut down from 10 coffees a day to 5 then start with getting rid of one. But, when you cut out that 10th coffee, go and drink a glass of water instead. Form a small habit and get your mind and body used to it.

5. Build

Slowly, very slowly build up on that habit. Don’t rush it. Remember, it’s still a marathon. It’s easy to trip. Often you won’t know you’ve pushed it too hard until it happens. Build on your habit slowly. Compound it. Get your mind and body used to it.

6. Ingrain

Once you’ve been going at it for a month you will have started to ingrain that habit. You can still trip but you’re more invested. Most things in life take some sort of investment and, normally, work. If losing weight was the goal then stopping what you’ve been doing and binge eating probably isn’t the answer. You’ve worked hard to build this habit so do that little bit extra to ingrain it. Sure, take a day off and reward yourself but stick with it.

Self-Investment

Don’t be part of that 95% that fails to achieve. This month, start the year as you mean to go on. Be part of the top 5%. This needs to be about self-investment. Pick goals that you want to achieve, commit to them and become accountable. This is a marathon so start small, build on your successes and then ingrain those habits. Make 2016 the year that you achieve your goals.

Today’s goal-setting article was shared from the following website: https://medium.com/the-mission/how-to-achieve-your-goals-in-6-easy-steps-4900588f251b

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Choose Your Attitude and Choose the Kind of Day You Will Have!

Attitude is the most important decision you’ll make today Paul Dughi

Attitude is adhesive; the choices we make regarding our state of mind invariably impact those around us.  There are days we wake in a rush, haphazardly slap on some attitude, and hustle out the door.  Perhaps we’ve chosen hurried, indifferent, skeptical, defeated.  Drama ensues, things go awry and take more time that we have.  We limp home late, exhausted.

Imagine instead what would happen had we intentionally selected ready, interested, optimistic, successful.  Interaction is smooth, collaboration high, and we smile at the end of the day, realizing we deserve applause for a job well done.

Sounds easy, until we find ourselves real-life center-stage, balancing between comedy and tragedy in the classic battle of growth mindset versus fixed mindset.

A growth mindset enthusiastically encourages us to embrace challenges as opportunities to improve.  A fixed mindset shakes its head, no no, hopelessly lamenting this is as far as we go.When folks ask me where I got my “go get ‘em” attitude, I must confess; I’m hardwired for happy.  Initially, it was hard work.  And it often still is, but worth it.  When I see daunting situations peeking around the corner, I prepare in advance by drafting a list of unbeatable attitudes.  Attentive, useful, resilient, grateful… I’m happy to hang tight to the merry countenance of comedy and toss tragedy away.

You can too.  Here’s how:

Compose a Proactive Plan – You know it’s coming – the disheartening deadline, the unexpected upset, the inconvenient interaction – so why not prepare? Choose Your Attitude starts in the quiet moments of self-control; the calm before the drama where we know we are fully equipped to make wise choices.  Give yourself permission and pause in the morning to preload a list of potential attitudes that will successfully serve as the day plays out.

Commit to a Compelling Goal – Whether it’s contribution to a community effort, standing up as an active corporate citizen, lavishing affection on those most precious to you, or simply taking great care of yourself, dedicating your efforts to a project or a process leads to positive personal and professional growth.

Cultivate a Sense of Curiosity – Avoid the brain freeze associated with negative attitudes by becoming relentlessly curious.  Ask yourself, “If I altered my perspective, what would I see differently?”  Join forces with new people, pool resources, read, discover, stretch, and develop the flexibility that accompanies expansive thinking.

Conjure up the Winning Sensation – Whether recalling a happy memory or predicting a future victory, taking time to positively visualize can clear away the cobwebs. Pause, picture yourself in celebration mode, let out that deep breath of frustration, and breathe in a new outlook.  Essentially, out with the bad attitude, in with the good.

“Choose Your Attitude!”  It’s a decision to live on purpose.

In need of an attitude boost? Check out these 5 favorite quotes:

“It is our attitude at the beginning of a difficult task which, more than anything else, will affect its successful outcome.” – William James

“If you have it and you know you have it, then you have it. If you have it and don’t know you have it, you don’t have it. If you don’t have it but you think you have it, then you have it.” – Jackie Gleason

“The remarkable thing is, we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day.” – Charles R. Swindoll

“If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.” – Maya Angelou

“Ability is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.” – Lou Holtz

Today’s inspiring article was shared from the following website: http://www.fishphilosophy.com/choose-attitude-4-steps-ditch-drama/

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A Purpose Greater than Ourselves…

Service to others is the rent you pay for your room here on earth Muhammed Ali

10 Life Lessons From Muhammad Ali

When you hear someone shouting out, ‘I am the greatest!’ – then most of us would not necessarily want to hear any more. We’d leave.

But there is one man who stated this and captivated our attention. The fact was that Muhammad Ali would have to have been one of the greatest and famous boxers to enter the ring. In addition to his quick feet, he also had a quick mouth that ignited his audiences as much as his fighting prowess gained the respect of his opponents in the ring.

Here are 10 of his golden gems – that if applied to your life – will make you great.

1. It’s not the action that makes a thing right or wrong, but the purpose behind the action.

I know that I constantly encourage my readers to take action. But it goes deeper than that. We must take ‘right’ action motivated by a purpose greater than ourselves. It must be a purpose designed to help others and to make for a better world.

If our purpose is selfish, its longevity will be unsustainable, but if it is given as an act of generosity, then who knows what power is emitted by such action?

2. We have one life; it soon will be past; what we do for God is all that will last.

You and I have been created for a divine purpose. Have you discovered what yours is?

This is not a question about religion, but rather about a responsibility we have as humans while planted here on planet earth.

Find your purpose. Fulfill your purpose. And while you’re at it check in with the boss to make certain you’re not trying to fill someone else’s shoes. Nothing worse than getting to the end of your life not fulfilling your calling and applying your potential.

3. I would have been the world’s greatest at whatever I did. If I were a garbage man, I’d be the world’s greatest garbage man! I’d pick up more garbage and faster than anyone has ever seen. To tell you the truth, I would have been the greatest at whatever I’d done!

If you’re going to do anything – be the greatest. Don’t be satisfied with second best. Go first class. Put 100% effort into everything you do. Don’t be slap dash. Add excellence as your secret ingredient to every task you undertake. Don’t remain a follower. Determine to be a leader.

4. To be able to give away riches is mandatory if you wish to possess them. This is the only way that you will be truly rich.

I see myself as a channel through which flows the riches that overflow in the direction of my life.

I am not a dam, nor a blocked aqueduct. I am a river – a steward of the wealth that I attract, and then dispense as directed by my heart. Therein lies a rich life.

5. I don’t have to be what anyone else wants me to be. I am free to be who I want to be.

To be me is to be free. Break all chains that seek to entangle you – whether it be parental expectations, organizational demands or societies conformities. You are unique, and in order to operate in that uniqueness you must resist conformity if you are to truly embrace your destiny.

6. Love is a net that catches hearts like a fish.

Let love do its powerful work within you. Love draws. Love attracts. Love builds. Love heals. Love captivates.

Love is the magnet that will pull the very best that life has to offer into your world, while at the same time act as a beacon of light and heat that will warm the hearts of generations.

7. I am riding on my horse of hope, holding in my hand the rein of courage. Dressed in the armor of patience, with the helmet of endurance on my head, I started out on my journey to the land of love.

Each of us is on a journey filled with hope – and to that hope attach courage, patience and endurance, and it will lead you to the land of love. Add faith to that combination – faith in yourself, faith in your creator, and faith in the universal law that states that as you sow in love you will reap love.

8. It isn’t the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it’s the pebble in your shoe.

Take time to pause a moment in order to remove any pebbles you may have picked up along the way. These can take the form of small bad habits, seeds of unforgiveness, lack of discipline, secret fears, or even devious doubts.

Pull aside, even for a moment. Address them. Deal with them. Destroy them. For many a mountaineer has fallen to their death because of an unaddressed pebble. Deal with the pebbles in your life decisively, and you will conquer many more mountaintops.

9. Wisdom is knowing when you can’t be wise.

We are human. We cannot know everything. We cannot be good at everything, for we have strengths and we have weaknesses. If you do not have the wisdom in a certain area of your life then seek out the wise and make them your friends. Together we can become all wise and all knowing.

10. Old age is just a record of one’s whole life.

What does your record look like thus far? Every day you and I breathe we are writing the next page that will be included in the volume called, ‘My life’.

Within its record will be scribbles, mistakes, smudges, scratchings, all mixed up with moments of great joy, eloquence, sadness, wisdom and folly. But by the time we reach the last page – may it end with the words, ‘I have lived a full and fulfilled life – read and learn from my mistakes – and for the rest of the success story contained – there went I, but by the grace of God.’

Today’s article is shared from the following website: https://www.motivationalmemo.com/10-life-lessons-from-muhammad-ali/

 

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The Gift of Helping Others is Priceless

There is no exercise better for the heart than reaching down and lifting people up John Holmes

Intermission at a recent concert of mine in California. I was touching up my makeup and hair when someone delivered a note to me in my dressing room. “I’m out here watching you tonight, and I couldn’t be prouder.” Signed, Mrs. Nehrens.

​In an instant I was whisked back more than 40 years to the Professional Children’s School in New York. There was my math teacher, Mrs. Nehrens, her smile brighter than a spotlight and her voice like a trumpet in a jazz band. You had to listen. Still, my mind wandered sometimes—especially during geometry, which I couldn’t make heads nor tails of—and I’d cut up. I loved to do my imitation of Johnny Ray crooning “Cry.” It brought down the house at the Apollo. Mrs. Nehrens was not amused.

“Leslie,” she said, “this is not a stage. This is a place of serious study.”

Professional Children’s was a private school for young performers. In the hallway before homeroom you’d catch a ballerina sewing ribbons on her toe shoes or a violinist studying a score. It was understood that sometimes we had to dart out for auditions and rehearsals. I’d already been excused to sing on Milton Berle’s show and Arthur Godfrey’s. But there was no skipping out on academics. We had to keep up with our schoolwork.

Algebra had been a breeze. But geometry? I couldn’t figure out the difference between an equilateral triangle and an isosceles triangle—or were they the same thing? Many times Mrs. Nehrens stayed late with me after school. She guided me through the theorems and proofs and equations. One summer she even tutored me. She didn’t want me to flunk out.

We never would have been able to afford the school if it weren’t for Aunt Eloise. She was a performer too. She’d been one of the Blackbirds of 1928 on Broadway and sang in Porgy and Bess. “You’ll go to Professional Children’s,” she announced.

“We don’t have the money for that,” my mom replied. She’d quit her job to accompany me on auditions and rehearsals, and Dad had already taken on two other jobs in addition to his regular work as an elevator operator to make up the difference.

“I’ll help out,” Aunt Eloise said.

We lived in Washington Heights in upper Manhattan, and I sang at St. James Presbyterian Church on 141st Street. Our choir director was always urging me to blend in better. “Don’t be so loud, Leslie,” she said. Well, I didn’t want to hold back. There was no hiding my talent under a bushel. “This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine,” I sang out. The Lord himself seemed to be doing a good job of letting that happen.

Until I turned 12. I wasn’t a cute kid anymore, but a gangly adolescent. Work dried up. I still took singing lessons and dance classes, but that was all the performing I did besides my doo-wopping in the hallway at school.

The biggest blow came that fall. One day Mom sat me down and said, “Leslie, I have some bad news. We can’t afford tuition at Professional Children’s anymore.”

“What about Aunt Eloise?” I asked.

“Work has been slow for her too,” Mom said. “It won’t be so bad. You can go to George Washington right here in the neighborhood. A lot of your friends are there.”

“But how will I be able to go on auditions? How will I get my career going again?”

Mom shook her head. In that instant I saw that light of mine go out. I would never step onstage again. All I could imagine ahead were years of drudgery. Had all the performing I’d done as a youngster been just a fluke?

Both of my grandfathers were ministers, and I was used to hearing their graces before dinner, prayers that went on and on until our food was cold. That night I got down on my knees and started praying like they prayed.

“Dear Father God, I am so grateful for all you’ve given me: Mom and Dad and Aunt Eloise. And my singing voice and my acting. You’re going to have to help me, God, because I want to keep going to this school that helps me do all that…”

But the first day of school I was trudging up the hill to George Washington, not shooting downtown on the subway to Professional Children’s.

That afternoon I sat at the kitchen table, staring at my homework. The phone rang, and I didn’t bother to answer it. I didn’t want to talk to anyone. “Yes, yes,” I heard my mother say. “Thank you so much. We can never repay you for this.”

Mom came into the kitchen, tears in her eyes.

“That was Mrs. Nehrens,” she said. Why was my old teacher calling us? “She called this morning and wanted to know why you weren’t in school,” Mom continued. “I told her we couldn’t afford Professional Children’s anymore. Well, she just found a scholarship for you from the Presbyterian Church. It will cover your tuition for the rest of the school year.”

I jumped up and gave Mom a huge hug. And back at Professional Children’s, I gave Mrs. Nehrens a hug too.

That year turned out to be an important one for me. I landed a spot on the TV show Name That Tune and won twenty-five thousand dollars. Record producer and songster Mitch Miller heard me do “The Lord’s Prayer” on the show and signed me to Columbia Records. Later, I was a regular on Mitch’s popular sing-along TV show. And that eventually led to Broadway.

So when I read Mrs. Nehrens’s note in my dressing room, I knew I had a huge debt of gratitude to repay. I stepped back onstage and announced, “Folks, I want you to meet the lady who made it possible for me to get where I am today.” I had the crew shine the spotlight on Mrs. Nehrens, because as I discovered more than 40 years ago, nobody’s light can shine all on its own. It takes help from people like my old math teacher. “Thank you, Mrs. Nehrens,” I said. “Take a bow.”

She deserved it. She taught me a lot more than just geometry.

Today’s inspiring story was shared from the following website: https://www.guideposts.org/better-living/entertainment/movies-and-tv/guideposts-classics-leslie-uggams-on-lending-a-helping

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